Duke Center for Firearms Law
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About Jake Charles

Center Executive Director and lecturing fellow.  Charles writes and teaches on the Second Amendment and firearms law. His primary academic interests include the theoretical, conceptual, and methodological issues confronting nascent Second Amendment jurisprudence and the immunity and related questions surrounding affirmative litigation against the firearms industry. His scholarship has appeared or is forthcoming in the Virginia Law ReviewNorth Carolina Law Review, and Law & Contemporary Problems, among others.

Written by Jake Charles

Hofeld on International Responses to Mass Shootings

Posted by on July 26, 2019

The Minnesota Journal of International Law recently published a comparative paper from Zachary Hofeld, Studying Abroad: Foreign Legislative Responses to Mass Shootings and Their Viability in the United States. From the Introduction (footnotes omitted): As difficult as they are to relive, the horrors of Newtown, Orlando, Las Vegas, and Parkland conceal a horrifying truth: mass […]

Twitter Series: Historical Gun Law a Day

Posted by on July 23, 2019

The Center’s Twitter account—@DukeFirearmsLaw—has been a way for us to get out information about the Center, interesting scholarship and cases, and news about this blog. And we’ve recently started amplifying laws from the Repository of Historical Gun Laws. Through our new hashtag #HistoricalGunLawADay series, we’ve been highlighting one new historical law every single day, showing […]

Litigation Highlight: United States v. Class (D.C. Cir. 2019)

Posted by on July 22, 2019

Last Friday, the D.C. Circuit decided a big Second Amendment case, in which a defendant challenged his conviction for violating the federal law banning firearms on “Capitol Grounds.” In United States v. Class, the panel upheld the regulation against Second Amendment and Due Process challenges. The decision adds important context to the “sensitive places” doctrine […]

Mini-Symposium: Teaching Firearms Law

Posted by on July 8, 2019

Especially since the Supreme Court’s 2008 decision in District of Columbia v. Heller, there has been an increased interest not only in writing about firearms law (check out Joseph’s post here), but in teaching classes on it as well. Our admittedly unscientific evidence—personal experience and conversations with others—suggests that student demand is high, and that […]

Scholarship Highlight: Recent Firearms Law Articles

Posted by on July 3, 2019

In the past few weeks, there’s been some interesting Second Amendment and related firearms law scholarship published. Joseph Blocher highlighted one such paper last week. Here’s a few more that have caught my eye recently.

“A Rogue’s Gallery of Offenses,” Part II: Davis and Law Enforcement

Posted by on July 1, 2019

Last week, I wrote about the Supreme Court’s decision in Rehaif v. United States and how that decision, along with United States v. Davis, produced interesting lineups and may lead to big changes in the enforcement and prosecution of gun crimes. Today, I want to focus on Davis—and what it means for the future.

“A Rogue’s Gallery of Offenses”: Implications of Rehaif and Davis for Prosecuting Gun Crimes

Posted by on June 25, 2019

In the past week, the Supreme Court issued two decisions likely to have a major impact on gun prosecutions: Rehaif v. United States, in which the Court tossed out an immigrant’s conviction for unlawful possession of a firearm, and United States v. Davis, in which the Court tossed out a pair of convictions for possessing […]

Mini-Series on Historical Gun Laws: Felons, Foreigners, and Others Deemed Dangerous

Posted by on June 24, 2019

This week, we’re fortunate to have a three-part series by one of the Center’s excellent summer research assistants, Catie Carberry. Catie’s posts will provide an overview of the historical gun laws in the Center’s Repository of Historical Gun Laws, the largest publicly available single-site compilation of historical regulations of firearms. The Repository is the result […]

Forging Con Law Through a Gun Regulation Lens

Posted by on June 19, 2019

In reading the Supreme Court’s recent double-jeopardy opinion, Gamble v. United States, it struck me just how many major constitutional law cases involve guns and guns laws, even if sometimes at the periphery. Gamble, for instance, complained that his state law conviction for being a felon in possession of a firearm precluded his indictment under […]

Scholarship Highlight: Charleston Law Review Symposium on the Second Amendment

Posted by on June 17, 2019

In February, the Charleston Law Review hosted a symposium on “The Second Amendment 228 Years Later.” Papers from that symposium were just recently published to Westlaw. Unfortunately, I don’t see the articles publicly available for free, except for those on SSRN, but below I’ll post the citations for this interesting set of papers to come […]