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Repository of Historical Gun Laws

Jurisdiction: Illinois

An Act . . . To prevent the selling or pawning of arms, ammunition, cloathing, and accoutrements, Chapter XII, Sec. 2, in Laws Passed in the Territory of the United States North-West of the River Ohio from the Commencement of the Government to the 31 of December, 1791 (printed by Francis Childs and John Swaine).

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"And be it further enacted, That if any person shall pre-sume to bargain for, purchase, or receive in pledge, or as a gift, or cause or procure to be bargained for, purchased, or received in pledge or as a gift, on any pretence whatever, all or any par...

“And be it further enacted, That if any person shall pre-sume to bargain for, purchase, or receive in pledge, or as a gift, or cause or procure to be bargained for, purchased, or received in pledge or as a gift, on any pretence whatever, all or any part of the public arms, ammunition, clothing or accoutrements pertaining to any non-commissioned officer or private soldier in the service aforesaid (knowing him to be such) he or she so offending, shall on conviction, forfeit and pay for the first offence treble the value of the articles so purchased or recieved, the same to be recovered with costs, by action of debt or information, in any court of record, one half to the informer, and the other half to the United States, or the whole to the United States, where prosecution shall be first instituted on the public behalf alone; and for every repitition of the like offence by the same person, he or she so offending again, shall forfeit and pay in like manner treble the value of the articles purchased or received as aforesaid, together with costs, and shall moreover suffer imprisonment for a term not exceeding one month.”

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A Law for regulating and establishing the Militia in the Territory of the United States north-west of the river Ohio, Chapter I(B)(4), in Laws Passed in the Territory of the United States North-West of the River Ohio from the Commencement of the Government to the 31 of December, 1791 (printed by Francis Childs and John Swaine).

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"[A]ll male inhabitants of the age of sixteen and upwards, shall be armed, equipped and accoutred in the following manner: With a musket and bayonet, or rifle, cartridge box and pouch, or powder horn and bullet pouch, with forty rounds of cartridges, o...

“[A]ll male inhabitants of the age of sixteen and upwards, shall be armed, equipped and accoutred in the following manner: With a musket and bayonet, or rifle, cartridge box and pouch, or powder horn and bullet pouch, with forty rounds of cartridges, or one pound of powder and four pounds of lead, priming wire and brush and six flints.”

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An Act concerning the Kaskaskia Indians, in Nathaniel Pope, Laws of the Territory of Illinois (1815).

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That it shall not be lawful for any person whatever without license from the Governor or some sub-agent appointed by him to purchase or receive by gift or other wise of any of the before mentioned Indians, any horse mare, gun tomohaw, knife, blanket, s...

That it shall not be lawful for any person whatever without license from the Governor or some sub-agent appointed by him to purchase or receive by gift or other wise of any of the before mentioned Indians, any horse mare, gun tomohaw, knife, blanket, shrouding, calico, saddle, bridle, or any goods wares or merchandize whatever, that all such sales or gifts shall be considered as fraudulent on the part of the buyer or receiver and that any whit eperson or free person of coulour whatever so buying or receiving any such articles of any one of those Indians shall be liable to pay a fine of twenty dollars to be recovered before a justice of the peace . . . .”

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An act prohibiting the trading with Indians, Sec. 2, in Nathaniel Pope, Laws of the Territory of Illinois (1815).

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Be it further enacted, That if any person or persons, shall purchase or receive of any Indian in the way of barter, or trade a gun or other article commonly used in hunting, or any instrument of husbandry or cooking utensil, or clothing or horse, shall...

Be it further enacted, That if any person or persons, shall purchase or receive of any Indian in the way of barter, or trade a gun or other article commonly used in hunting, or any instrument of husbandry or cooking utensil, or clothing or horse, shall forfeit and pay any sum not exceeding fifty dollars nor less than ten, to the use of the territory . . . .

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An Act to suppress duelling, Adopted from the Virginia Code, in Nathaniel Pope, Laws of the Territory of Illinois (1815).

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any person who shall hereafter wilfully and maliciously, or by agree- ment fight a duel or single combat with any engine instrument or weapon, the probable consequence of which might be the death of either party, and in so doing shall kill his antagoni...

any person who shall hereafter wilfully and maliciously, or by agree- ment fight a duel or single combat with any engine instrument or weapon, the probable consequence of which might be the death of either party, and in so doing shall kill his antagonist or any other person or persons, or inflict such wound as that the person injured shall die thereof within three months thereafter, such offender, his aiders, abettors and councellors being thereof duly convicted shall be guilty of murder and suffer death by being hanged by the neck any law custom or usage of this territory to the contrary notwithstanding.

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1931 Ill. Laws 454, An Act to Regulate the Sale, Possession and Transportation of Machine Guns, § 7.

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Any person committing or attempting to commit arson, assault, burglary, kidnapping, larceny, rioting, or robbery while armed with a machine gun shall be imprisoned in the penitentiary for his natural life, or for a term not less than five years.

1931 Ill.Laws 453, An Act to Regulate the Sale, Possession and Transportation of Machine Guns, § 4.

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Every manufacturer or merchant shall keep a register of all machine guns manufactured or handled by him. This register shall show the date of the sale, loan, gift, delivery or receipt of any machine gun, the name, address and occupation of the person t...

Every manufacturer or merchant shall keep a register of all machine guns manufactured or handled by him. This register shall show the date of the sale, loan, gift, delivery or receipt of any machine gun, the name, address and occupation of the person to whom the machine gun was sold, loaned, given or delivered, or from whom it was received, and the purpose for which the person to whom the machine gun was sold, loaned, given or delivered, purchased or obtained said machine gun. Upon demand, every manufacturer or merchant shall permit any sheriff or deputy sheriff, or any police officer to inspect his entire stock of machine guns, parts and supplies therefor, and shall produce the register herein required and all written permits to purchase or possess a machine gun, which he has retained and filed in his place of business for inspection by such officer.

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1931 Ill. Laws 452-53, An Act to Regulate the Sale, Possession and Transportation of Machine Guns, §§ 1-2.

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§ 1. For purposes of this Act the term “machine gun” apples to and includes all firearms commonly known as machine rifles, machine guns and sub-machine guns of any calibre whatsoever, capable of automatically discharging more than eigh...

§ 1. For purposes of this Act the term “machine gun” apples to and includes all firearms commonly known as machine rifles, machine guns and sub-machine guns of any calibre whatsoever, capable of automatically discharging more than eight cartridges successively without reloading, in which the ammunition is fed to such gun from or by means of clips, disks, belts, or other separable mechanical device. The term “manufacturer” shall apply to and include all persons dealing with machine guns as merchandise. § 2. It is unlawful for any person to sell, keep or offer for sale, loan or give away, purchase, possess, carry or transport any machine gun within this State, except that 1. Sheriffs, constables, marshals, police officers and other duly appointed peace officers may purchase, possess, carry and transport machine guns. 2. The provisions of this Act shall not apply to the Army, Navy or Marine Corps of the United States, the National Guard, and organizations authorized by law to purchase or receive machine guns from the United States, or from this State, and the members of such Corps, National Guard and organizations while on duty, may possess, carry and transport machine guns. 3. Persons, organizations or institutions possessing war relics may purchase and possess machine guns which are relics of any war in which the United States was involved, may exhibit and carry such machine guns in the parades of any military organization, and may sell, offer to sell, loan or give such machine guns to other persons, organizations or institutions possessing war relics. 4. Guards or messengers employed by common carriers, banks and trust companies, and pay-roll guards or messengers may possess and carry machine guns while actually employed in and about the shipment, transportation or delivery, or in the guarding of any money, treasure, bullion, bonds or other thing of value, and their employers may purchase or receive machine guns and keep them in their possession when such guns are not being used by such guards or messengers 5. Manufacturers and merchants may sell, keep or offer for sale, loan or give away, purchase, possess and transport, machine guns, in the same manner as other merchandise except as hereinafter provided, and common carriers may possess and transport unloaded machine guns, as other merchandise.

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1917 Ill. Laws 341, An Act to Define and Provide a Punishment for the Crime of Burglary with Explosives, § 1.

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. . . Whoever with the intent to commit any crime, breaks and enters any building, and for the purpose of committing any crime uses or attemps to use nitro-glycerine, dynamite, gunpowder or any other explosive, shall be deemed guilty of burglary with e...

. . . Whoever with the intent to commit any crime, breaks and enters any building, and for the purpose of committing any crime uses or attemps to use nitro-glycerine, dynamite, gunpowder or any other explosive, shall be deemed guilty of burglary with explosives and shall be imprisoned in the penitentiary not less than five years, nor more than twenty years.

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Samuel Irwin, Reports of Cases At Law And In Chancery 566 (vol. #278, Chicago, Ill, 1917).

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It shall be the duty of the general superintendent of police to refuse such permit to (a) all persons having been convicted of any crime; (b) all minors. Otherwise, in case he shall be satisfied that the applicant is a person of good moral character, it s...

It shall be the duty of the general superintendent of police to refuse such permit to (a) all persons having been convicted of any crime; (b) all minors. Otherwise, in case he shall be satisfied that the applicant is a person of good moral character, it shall be the duty of the general superintendent of police to grant such permit upon the payment of a fee of one dollar.

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