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Jurisdiction: New Jersey

Ordinances of Jersey City, Passed By The Board Of Aldermen since May 1, 1871, under the Act Entitled “An Act to Re-organize the Local Government of Jersey City,” Passed March 31, 1871, and the Supplements Thereto Page 46, Image 46 (1874) available at The Making of Modern Law: Primary Sources.

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[Ordinances of Jersey City, NJ, In Relation to the Sidewalks, Public Grounds and Streets in Jersey City,] § 26. No person shall, within this city, fire or discharge any gun, pistol, cannon, or fowling piece or other fire-arms, unless in defense of...

[Ordinances of Jersey City, NJ, In Relation to the Sidewalks, Public Grounds and Streets in Jersey City,] § 26. No person shall, within this city, fire or discharge any gun, pistol, cannon, or fowling piece or other fire-arms, unless in defense of his property or person; nor let off any squibs, crackers or other fireworks, unless by permission of the city authorities, under the penalty of ten dollars for each and every offense; provided, however, that this section of the ordinance shall not apply to the Fourth of July.

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Ordinances of Jersey City, Passed By The Board Of Aldermen since May 1, 1871, under the Act Entitled “An Act to Re-organize the Local Government of Jersey City,” Passed March 31, 1871, and the Supplements Thereto Page 41, Image 41 (1874) available at The Making of Modern Law: Primary Sources.

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An Ordinance To Prevent the Carrying of Loaded or Concealed Weapons within the Limits of Jersey City. The Mayor and Aldermen of Jersey City do ordain as follows: § 1. That it shall not be lawful for any person or persons (excepting policemen and p...

An Ordinance To Prevent the Carrying of Loaded or Concealed Weapons within the Limits of Jersey City. The Mayor and Aldermen of Jersey City do ordain as follows: § 1. That it shall not be lawful for any person or persons (excepting policemen and private watchmen when on duty), within the corporate limits of Jersey City, to carry, have, or keep concealed on his or her person any instrument or weapon commonly known as a slung-shot, billy, sand-club or metal knuckles, and any dirk or dagger (not contained as a blade of a pocket-knife), and loaded pistol or other dangerous weapon, under the penalty of not exceeding twenty dollars for each offense. § 2. That it shall not be lawful for any person or persons (excepting policemen and private watchmen when on duty), within the corporate limits of Jersey City, to carry or wear any sword in a cane, or air-gun, under the penalty of not exceeding twenty dollars for each offense. § 3. Any forfeiture on penalty arising under this ordinance may be recovered in the manner specified by the City Charter, and all persons violating any of the provisions aforesaid shall, upon conviction, stand committed until the same be paid.

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Mercer Beasley Revision of the Statutes of New Jersey: Published under the Authority of the Legislature; by Virtue of an Act Approved April 4 1871.Page 236-237, Image 282-283 (Trenton, 1877) available at The Making of Modern Law: Primary Sources. .

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Crimes Against Public Morals and the Institution of Marriage, § 54. The opening or keeping of any room or place for playing billiards, or A.. B. C. or E. O. Table or tables or at tennis, bowls, or shuffle-board, or at faro banks, or other bank or ...

Crimes Against Public Morals and the Institution of Marriage, § 54. The opening or keeping of any room or place for playing billiards, or A.. B. C. or E. O. Table or tables or at tennis, bowls, or shuffle-board, or at faro banks, or other bank or l, or of like kind, under any denomination whatever, or for playing at nine-pins, or any other number of pins, or for cock-fighting, or for pistol shooting, either for money or without money, within three miles of the main building of the College of New Jersey, or of “Rutgers College” or of Drew Seminary or University, in New Jersey, shall be and hereby are declared to be offences against this state; and the owner, tenant, keeper, or attendant, of such room or place shall be prosecuted and proceeded against by indictment, and upon conviction shall be fined in a sum not exceeding two hundred dollars, or by imprisonment for a period not exceeding six months, or both at the discretion of the court.

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James Ewing, Ordinances of the Common Council of the City of Trenton; with the Acts of the Legislature Relative to Said City Page 80, Image 80 (1842) available at The Making of Modern Law: Primary Sources.

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Ordinances of the [City of Trenton], An Ordinance Concerning the Firing of Guns, Be it Ordained and Enacted by the inhabitants of the city of Trenton, in common council assembled, and it is hereby enacted by the authority of the same, § 1. From an...

Ordinances of the [City of Trenton], An Ordinance Concerning the Firing of Guns, Be it Ordained and Enacted by the inhabitants of the city of Trenton, in common council assembled, and it is hereby enacted by the authority of the same, § 1. From and after the passing of this act, if any person or persons shall fire, discharge, or let off any gun, pistol, squib, or other fire-work within this city, within two hundred yards of any dwelling-house, stable, or any other building, or any hay or grain stack, every such person or persons so offending, and being thereof convicted before any one of the magistrates of this city, either by his own view, by the confession of the offender, or by the oath or affirmation of one credible witness, shall forfeit and pay for every such offence the sum of one dollar, to be sued for and recovered, together with costs of suit, in an action of debt, by the treasurer of the city, and applied to and for the use of the city; provided always, that nothing in this act shall be so construed as to prevent the firing of military salutes without any of the public streets, lanes, or alleys of this city on the fourth day of July, or on any other public occasion.

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1837 N.J. Laws 373, An Act to Incorporate the City of Trenton, § 24.

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That it shall and may be lawful for the common council of the said city, in common council convened, to pass such ordinances as to them shall seem meet . . . for regulating the keeping and transporting of gunpowder or other combustible or dangerous mat...

That it shall and may be lawful for the common council of the said city, in common council convened, to pass such ordinances as to them shall seem meet . . . for regulating the keeping and transporting of gunpowder or other combustible or dangerous materials.

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Charles Nettleton, Laws of the State of New-Jersey Page 259, Image 286 (Trenton, 1821) available at The Making of Modern Law: Primary Sources.

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Laws of New Jersey (1820) § 56. And be it enacted by the authority aforesaid, That if any person shall, by word, message, letter, or any other way, challenge another to a fight a duel, with a rapier, or small sword, backsword, pistol, or other dan...

Laws of New Jersey (1820) § 56. And be it enacted by the authority aforesaid, That if any person shall, by word, message, letter, or any other way, challenge another to a fight a duel, with a rapier, or small sword, backsword, pistol, or other dangerous weapon, or shall accept a challenge, although no duel be fought, or knowingly by the bearer of such challenge, or shall any ways abet, prompt, encourage, persuade, seduce, or cause any person to fight a duel, or to challenge another to fight such a duel, every person so offending shall be deemed guilty of a misdemeanor, and on conviction, shall be punished by fine, not exceeding two years or both And further, If any person shall engage in a fight a duel and another with rapier , or small sword, back sword, pistol, or other dangerous weapon, although death does not thereby ensue, or shall be a second in any such duel, then, and in such case every person so offending shall be judged guilty of a high misdemeanor, and, on conviction, shall be punished by fine, not exceeding one thousand dollars, or imprisonment at hard labor, not exceeding four years, or both.

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1811 N.J. Laws 300, An Act to Regulate Gun Powder Manufactories and Magazines within this State, § 1.

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. . . [N]o person or persons whatsoever, shall be permitted within this state to erect or establish, or cause to be erected or established, any manufactory which shall be actually employed in manufacturing gun-powder, either by himself or any other per...

. . . [N]o person or persons whatsoever, shall be permitted within this state to erect or establish, or cause to be erected or established, any manufactory which shall be actually employed in manufacturing gun-powder, either by himself or any other person, either on his own land or another, within the distance of a quarter of a mile from any town or village or house of public worship; or within the distance of a quarter of a mile from any dwelling house, barn or out house, without the consent under hand and seal of all and every the owner or owners of such dwelling house, barn, or out house as aforesaid; and any person so offending shall be guilty of a misdemeanor, and on conviction thereof shall be fined any sum not exceeding two thousand dollars: Provided, that nothing in this section shall be so construed as to prevent the completing, rebuilding or repairing any powder mill now erected or erecting in this state on the site on which the same shall be now erected or erecting.

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Charles Nettleton, Laws of the State of New-Jersey Page 549, Image 576 (1821) available at The Making of Modern Law: Primary Sources.

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An Act to Regulate Gun-Powder Manufactories and Magazines within this State. §1. Be it enacted by the Council and General Assembly of this state, and it is hereby enacted by the authority of the same, That from and after the first day of May next,...

An Act to Regulate Gun-Powder Manufactories and Magazines within this State. §1. Be it enacted by the Council and General Assembly of this state, and it is hereby enacted by the authority of the same, That from and after the first day of May next, no person or persons whatsoever, shall be permitted within this state to erect or establish, or cause to be erected or established, any manufactory which shall be actually employed in manufacturing gun-powder, either by himself or any other person, either on his own land or the land of another, within the distance of a quarter of a mile from any town or village, or house of public worship; or within the distance of a quarter of a mile from any dwelling-house, barn or out-house, without the consent, under hand and seal, of all and every the owner or owners of such dwelling-house, barn or outhouse, as aforesaid; and any person so offending shall be guilty of a misdemeanor, and on conviction thereof shall be fined any sum not exceeding two thousand dollars: Provided, That nothing in this section shall be so construed as to prevent the completing, rebuilding or repairing any powder-mill now erected or erecting in this state on the site on which the same shall be now erected or erecting. § 2. And be it enacted, That no person or persons hereafter shall be permitted to erect or cause to be erected any powder magazine within this state, either upon his own land or the land of any other person, and actually deposit gun-powder therein, within the distance of half a mile from any town or village, house of public worship, dwelling-house or out-house. And any person so offending shall be guilty of a misdemeanor, and on conviction thereof shall be fined not exceeding the sum of two thousand dollars.

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Charles Nettleton, Laws of the State of New-Jersey Page 474, Image 501 (1821) available at The Making of Modern Law: Primary Sources.

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[An Act to Describe, Apprehend and Punish Disorderly Persons (1799)], § 2. And whereas diverse ill disposed persons are frequently apprehended, having upon them implements for house-breaking, or offensive weapons, or are found in or upon houses, w...

[An Act to Describe, Apprehend and Punish Disorderly Persons (1799)], § 2. And whereas diverse ill disposed persons are frequently apprehended, having upon them implements for house-breaking, or offensive weapons, or are found in or upon houses, warehouses, stables, barns or out-houses, areas of houses, coach-houses, smoke-houses, enclosed yards, or gardens belonging to houses, with intent to commit theft, misdemeanors or other offences; and although their evil purposes are thereby manifested, the power of the justices of the peace to demand of them sureties for their good behavior hath not been of sufficient effect to prevent them from carrying their evil purpose into execution; Be it further enacted, That if any person shall be apprehended, having upon him or her any picklock, key, crow, jack, bit or other implement, with an intent to break and enter into any dwelling-house or out-house; or shall have upon him or her any pistol, hanger, cutlass, bludgeon, or other offensive weapon, with intent to assault any person; or shall be found in or upon any dwelling-house, ware-house, stable, barn, coach-house, smoke-house or out-house, or in any enclosed yard or garden, or area belonging to any house, with an intent to steal any goods or chattels, then he or she shall be deemed and adjudged to be a disorderly person.

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Charles Nettleton, Laws of the State of New-Jersey Page 370-371, Image 397-398 (1821) available at The Making of Modern Law: Primary Sources.

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[An Act Respecting Slaves, § 9. And be it enacted, That if any negro or other slave shall be seen or found from the dwelling-house of his or her master or mistress after the hour of ten at night, except on the particular business of his or her mas...

[An Act Respecting Slaves, § 9. And be it enacted, That if any negro or other slave shall be seen or found from the dwelling-house of his or her master or mistress after the hour of ten at night, except on the particular business of his or her master or mistress, or shall be seen to hunt or carry a gun on the first day of the week, or Christian Sabbath, commonly called Sunday, any constable or other person, of information or knowledge thereof, is hereby authorized, and it is especially made the duty of such constable, to apprehend and carry such negro or other slave before the next justice or justices of the peace, who, on examination of the matter, (is such slave shall not give good account of himself or herself) shall, at his or their due discretion, according to the circumstances of the case, do and act towards such slave in the same manner in all respects as by the preceding section of this act is prescribed; and any such slave, being committed to prison, shall there remain until the master or mistress shall satisfy all reasonable charges; and in case such slave shall be ordered to be whipped, then the master or mistress of such slave shall be liable to pay the constable for performing that service one dollar; Provided, That nothing in this, or the preceding section contained, shall be construed or taken to prevent any negro or other slave from going to any place of worship, or from any innocent recreation, or from doing any other reasonable act with his or her master or mistresses consent.]

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