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Jurisdiction: New York

George R. Donnan, Annotated Code of Criminal Procedure and Penal Code of the State of New York as Amended 1882-5. Fourth Edition Page 172, image 699 (1885) available at The Making of Modern Law: Primary Sources.

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Making Selling, Etc., Dangerous Weapons, § 409. A person who manufactures, or causes to be manufactured, or sells or keeps for sale, or offers, or gives, or disposes of, any instrument or weapon of the kind usually known as slung-shot, billy, sand...

Making Selling, Etc., Dangerous Weapons, § 409. A person who manufactures, or causes to be manufactured, or sells or keeps for sale, or offers, or gives, or disposes of, any instrument or weapon of the kind usually known as slung-shot, billy, sand club or metal knuckles, or who, in any city in this state, without the written consent of a police magistrate, sells or gives any pistol or other fire-arm to any person under the age of eighteen years is guilty of a misdemeanor.

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Charter and Ordinances of the City of Syracuse: Together with the Rules of the Common Council, the Rules and Regulations of the Police and Fire Departments, and the Civil Service Regulations Page 184, Image 185 (1885) available at The Making of Modern Law: Primary Sources.

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Ordinances of [the City of Syracuse,] Gunpowder, Etc. § 1. No person except when on military duty in the public service of the United States, or of this State, or in case of public celebration with permission of the mayor or common council, shall ...

Ordinances of [the City of Syracuse,] Gunpowder, Etc. § 1. No person except when on military duty in the public service of the United States, or of this State, or in case of public celebration with permission of the mayor or common council, shall have, keep or possess in any building, or carriage, or on any dock, or in any boat or other vessel, or in any other place within the city limits, gun-powder, giant- powder, nitro-glycerine, dynamite or other explosive material, in quantity exceeding one pound, without written permission from the chief engineer of the fire department. Any person violating any of the provisions of this section shall be liable to a fine of not less than ten nor more than one hundred dollars, or to imprisonment in the penitentiary of the county for not less than thirty days nor more than three months, for each offense.

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George R. Donnan, Annotated Code of Criminal Procedure and Penal Code of the State of New York as Amended 1882-5 Page 172, Image 699 (1885) available at The Making of Modern Law: Primary Sources.

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Carrying, Using, Etc., Certain Weapons, § 410. A person who attempts to use against another, or who, with intent so to use, carries, conceals or possesses any instrument or weapon of the kind commonly known as the slung-shot, billy, sand –cl...

Carrying, Using, Etc., Certain Weapons, § 410. A person who attempts to use against another, or who, with intent so to use, carries, conceals or possesses any instrument or weapon of the kind commonly known as the slung-shot, billy, sand –club or metal knuckles, or a dagger, dirk or dangerous knife, is guilty of a felony. Any person under the age of eighteen years who shall have, carry or have in his possession in any public street, highway or place in any city of this state, without a written license from a police magistrate of such city, any pistol or other fire-arm of any kind, shall be guilty of a misdemeanor. This section shall not apply to the regular and ordinary transportation of fire-arms as merchandise, or for use without the city limits. § 411. Possession, Presumptive Evidence. The possession, by any person other than a public officer, of any of the weapons specified in the last section, concealed or furtively carried on the person, is presumptive evidence of carrying, or concealing, or possessing, with intent to use the same in violation of that section.

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The Penal Code of the State of New York. In Force December 1, 1882, as Amended by Laws of 1882 and 1883 with Notes of Decisions and a Full Index Vol. 6 Page 98, Image 104 (1883) available at The Making of Modern Law: Primary Sources.

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Discharging Firearms in Public Places, § 468. A person, who willfully discharges any species of firearms, air-gun, or other weapon, or throws any deadly missile in any public place, or in any place where there is any person to be endangered thereb...

Discharging Firearms in Public Places, § 468. A person, who willfully discharges any species of firearms, air-gun, or other weapon, or throws any deadly missile in any public place, or in any place where there is any person to be endangered thereby, although no injury to any person shall ensue, is guilty of a misdemeanor.

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Charles Wheeler, By-Laws of the Village of Mechanicville. Adopted by the Trustees October 18, 1881 Page 7, Image 8 (1881) available at The Making of Modern Law: Primary Sources.

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[Ordinances of the Village of Mechanicville, NY,] Fires and Their Prevention, Fire Arms and Fire Works, § 20. No person, except on the anniversary of our national independence, and on that day only, at such place or places as the President or Trus...

[Ordinances of the Village of Mechanicville, NY,] Fires and Their Prevention, Fire Arms and Fire Works, § 20. No person, except on the anniversary of our national independence, and on that day only, at such place or places as the President or Trustees shall permit, shall fire, discharge or set off, in the village, any gun, cannon, pistol, rocket, squib, cracker or fire ball, under the penalty of five dollars for each offense.

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George S. Diossy, The Statute Law of the State of New York: Comprising the Revised Statutes and All Other Laws of General Interest, in Force January 1, 1881, Arranged Alphabetically According to Subjects Page 321, Image 324 (Vol. 1, 1881) available at The Making of Modern Law: Primary Sources.

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Offenses Against Public Decency; Malicious Mischief, and Other Crimes not Before Enumerated, Concealed Weapons, § 9. Every person who shall within this state use, or attempt to use, or with intent to use against any other person, shall knowingly a...

Offenses Against Public Decency; Malicious Mischief, and Other Crimes not Before Enumerated, Concealed Weapons, § 9. Every person who shall within this state use, or attempt to use, or with intent to use against any other person, shall knowingly and secretly conceal on his person, or with like intent shall willfully and furtively possess any instrument or weapon of the kind commonly known as a slung-shot, billy, sand club or metal knuckles, and any dirk shall be deemed guilty of felony, and on conviction thereof may be punished by imprisonment in the state prison, or penitentiary or county jail, for a term not more than one year, or by a fine not exceeding five hundred dollars, or by both such fine and imprisonment.

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Elliott Fitch Shepard, Ordinances of the Mayor, Aldermen and Commonalty of the City of New York, in Force January 1, 1881; Adopted by the Common Council and Published by Their Authority Page 214-215, Image 214-215 (1881) available at The Making of Modern Law: Primary Sources.

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Carrying of Pistols, § 264. Every person except judges of the federal, state and city courts, and officers of the general, state and municipal governments authorized by law to make arrests, and persons to whom permits shall have been issued, as he...

Carrying of Pistols, § 264. Every person except judges of the federal, state and city courts, and officers of the general, state and municipal governments authorized by law to make arrests, and persons to whom permits shall have been issued, as hereinafter provided, who shall have in his possession within the city of New York a pistol of any description concealed on his person, or not carried openly, shall be deemed guilty of a misdemeanor, and shall be punished, on conviction by a fine not exceeding ten dollars, or, in default of payment of such fine by imprisonment not exceeding ten days. § 265. Any person, except as provided in this article, who has occasion to carry a pistol for his protection, may apply to the officer in command at the station-house of the precinct where he resided, and such officer, if satisfied that the applicant is a proper and law abiding person, shall give said person a recommendation to the superintendent of police, or the inspector in command at the central office in the absence of the superintendent, who shall issue a permit to the said person allowing him to carry a pistol of any description of any description. Any non-resident who does business in the city of New York, and has occasion to carry a pistol while in said city, must make application for permission to do so to the officer in command of the station-house of the police precinct in which his so does business, in the same manner as is required by residents of said city, and shall be subject to the same conditions and restrictions.

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William G. Bishop, Charter of the City of Brooklyn, Passed June 28, 1873. As Subsequently Amended. With the Charter of April 17, 1854, and the Amendments Thereto, and Other Laws Relating to Said City. Also, the Ordinances of the Common Council of the City of Brooklyn, as Codified and Revised and Adopted Dec.10, 1877 Page 192, Image 196 (1877) available at The Making of Modern Law: Primary Sources.

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[Ordinances of the City of Brooklyn, Miscellaneous Provisions,] § 15. It shall not be lawful for any person to have kegs of gunpowder, or cause to be kept in any store, storehouse, manufactory or other building within the city of Brooklyn, any qua...

[Ordinances of the City of Brooklyn, Miscellaneous Provisions,] § 15. It shall not be lawful for any person to have kegs of gunpowder, or cause to be kept in any store, storehouse, manufactory or other building within the city of Brooklyn, any quantity of gunpowder exceeding twenty-five pounds in weight, under the penalty of the forfeiture of the gun-powder and an additional penalty of fifty dollars; and all gunpowder which may be kept in any building within said city shall be kept in tin canisters, and said canisters shall, at all times, be kept securely closed, except when necessary for its delivery on sale.

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William G. Bishop, Charter of the City of Brooklyn, Passed June 28, 1873. As Subsequently Amended. With the Charter of April 17, 1854, and the Amendments Thereto, and Other Laws Relating to Said City. Also, the Ordinances of the Common Council of the City of Brooklyn, as Codified and Revised and Adopted Dec.10, 1877 Page 192, Image 196 (1877) available at The Making of Modern Law: Primary Sources.

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Ordinances of the [City of Brooklyn, Miscellaneous Provisions,] § 16. No person shall carry, or cause to be carried, any gunpowder through any street, lane or alley in the city, unless the same be secured in tight casks, kegs or cases, well headed...

Ordinances of the [City of Brooklyn, Miscellaneous Provisions,] § 16. No person shall carry, or cause to be carried, any gunpowder through any street, lane or alley in the city, unless the same be secured in tight casks, kegs or cases, well headed and hooped; and said casks, kegs or cases shall be put into and entirely covered with a bag or case sufficiently to prevent any said gunpowder from being spilled or scattered, under the penalty of forfeiture of the gunpowder and a fine of fifty dollars for every violation of the provisions of this act.

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John Worth Edmonds, Statutes at Large of the State of New York: Containing the General Statutes Passed in the Years 1871, 1872, 1873 and 1874 with a Reference to All the Decisions upon Them. Also, the Constitution of the State of New York as Amended in 1875. 2d ed. Page 188, Image 188 (Vol. 9, 1875) available at The Making of Modern Law: Primary Sources.

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An Act to Amend and Consolidate the Several Acts Relating to the Preservation of Moose, Wild Deer, Birds and Fish, § 3. No person shall at any time kill any wild duck, goose are or brant, with any device or instrument known as a swivel or punt gun...

An Act to Amend and Consolidate the Several Acts Relating to the Preservation of Moose, Wild Deer, Birds and Fish, § 3. No person shall at any time kill any wild duck, goose are or brant, with any device or instrument known as a swivel or punt gun, or with any gun other than such guns as are habitually raised at arms length and fired from the shoulder, or shall use any net, device or instrument, or gun other than such gun as aforesaid with intent to capture or kill any such wild duck, goose or brant under a penalty of one hundred dollars.

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