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Data Transparency & The Disparate Impact of the Felony Murder Rule

Posted by on August 11, 2020

[Ed. note: This guest blog post is part of the Center’s Mini-Symposium on papers presented at the 2020 Firearms Law Works-in-Progress Workshop.]    The American criminal justice system has historically and contemporaneously been plagued by racially disparate outcomes, but not all these disparities are equally decipherable through traditional outcome statistics. Researchers have done extensive empirical work […]

The Political Imperative to Self-Defend

Posted by on August 6, 2020

[Ed. note: This guest blog post is part of the Center’s Mini-Symposium on papers presented at the 2020 Firearms Law Works-in-Progress Workshop.] Does inter-personal self-defense necessarily implicate the political order under which it is exercised? Many moral philosophers, as well as many gun rights advocates, argue in the negative. The justification for a defensive act against […]

Public Carry and Public Health: Good Cause as a Good Solution

Posted by on August 6, 2020

[Ed. note: This guest blog post is part of the Center’s Mini-Symposium on papers presented at the 2020 Firearms Law Works-in-Progress Workshop.] A heavily armed man, Dmitriy Andreychenko, walks into his local Walmart, and was eventually taken out in handcuffs. Another heavily armed man, Patrick Crusius, walked into his local Walmart and left under the same […]

Scholarship Highlight Interview: George Mocsary on Firearms Law and the Second Amendment Casebook Online Chapters

Posted by on August 5, 2020

In the latest episode of the Scholarship Highlight interview series, I spoke with George Mocsary of University of Wyoming College of Law about his contributions to online chapters to the casebook Firearms Law and the Second Amendment: Regulation, Rights, and Policy. We talked about Chapter 14, on Comparative Law, and discussed the various ways other […]

It is Morally Permissible for Christians to Carry Firearms

Posted by on August 4, 2020

[Ed. note: This guest blog post is part of the Center’s Mini-Symposium on papers presented at the 2020 Firearms Law Works-in-Progress Workshop.] Is it morally permissible for faithful Christians to carry firearms? My paper argues that the answer is “yes.” I argue that Jesus’s instruction to sell one’s cloak and buy a sword in Luke […]

2020 Firearms Law Works-in-Progress Workshop

Posted by on August 3, 2020

At the end of July, the Center hosted its second summer Firearms Law Works-in-Progress Workshop. Our first one last year was a tremendous success, and we were again thrilled at the community of scholars that we were able to convene this year. We had authors spanning the globe (joining from at least four different time […]

Analyzing Maryland Extreme Risk Law Data

Posted by on July 29, 2020

This past week, Joseph and I just finished another round of edits on our forthcoming Virginia Law Review article, Firearms, Extreme Risk, and Legal Design: “Red Flag” Laws and Due Process. Doing those edits, and working on another draft paper related to extreme risk laws, led me to dive more deeply into the statistics that […]

Eleventh Circuit Not Open to As-Applied Challenges to the Felon Prohibitor

Posted by on July 27, 2020

In a forthcoming article in Law & Contemporary Problems, I address some of the conceptual confusion generated by the lifetime prohibition on firearm possession by those previously convicted of a felony offense. The difficulty arises at least in part from complicated factors in the function and adjudication of the felon prohibitor, which the Eleventh Circuit’s […]

The Distortion of Self-Defense and the Second Amendment in Missouri

Posted by on July 23, 2020

It’s become an all-too-familiar scenario: a gun owner becomes scared that a protester or mere passerby could endanger him and brandishes a gun. The gun owner then asserts that the rights to self-defense and to keep and bear arms protect him from a prosecution. This line of argument, which is playing out in the McCloskey […]

Scholarship Highlight Interview: Natalie Nanasi on Disarming Domestic Abusers

Posted by on July 22, 2020

I recently had a chance to talk with Natalie Nanasi, Assistant Professor of Law at SMU Dedman School of Law and Director of the Judge Elmo B. Hunter Legal Center for Victims of Crimes Against Women. Prof. Nanasi has written a lot of incisive scholarship on issues including immigration, domestic violence, and feminist legal theory. […]