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1923 Cal. Stat. 695 An Act to Control and Regulate the Possession, Sale and Use of Pistols, Revolvers, and Other Firearms Capable of Being Concealed Upon the Person

Section 1. On and after the date upon which this act takes effect, every person who within the State of California manufactures or causes to be manufactured, or who imports into the state, or who keeps for sale, or offers or exposes for sale, or who gives, lends, or possesses any instrument or weapon of the kind commonly known as a blackjack, slungshot, billy, sandclub, sandbag, or metal knuckles, or who carries concealed upon his person any explosive substance, other than fixed ammunition, or who carries concealed upon his person any dirk or dagger, shall be guilty of a felony and upon a conviction thereof shall be punishable by imprisonment in a state prison for not less than one year nor for more than five years.

Section 2. On and after the date upon which this act takes effect, no unnaturalized foreign born person and no person who has been convicted of a felony against the person or property of another or against the government of the United States or of the State of California or of any political subdivision thereof shall own or have in his possession or under his custody or control any pistol, revolver or other firearm capable of being concealed upon the person.




1931 PA. Laws 498, No. 158

Sec. 4. No person who has been convicted in this Commonwealth or elsewhere of a crime of violence shall own a firearm, or have one in his possession or under his control.

Sec. 5. No person shall carry a firearm in any vehicle or concealed on or about his person, except in his place of abode or fixed place of business, without a license therefor as hereinafter provided.




1925 Ind. Acts 496, ch. 207, An Act to Regulate and Control the Possession, Sale, and Use of Pistols and Revolvers in the State of Indiana

Sec 4. No person who has been convicted of a felony committed against the person or property of another shall own or have in his possession or under his control, within the State of Indiana, a pistol or revolver. A violation of this section shall constitute a felony and be punishable by imprisonment for not less than one year, and not more than five years.




An Ordinance Prohibiting the Sale of Arms, Ammunition, or Spiritous Liquors to the Indians, in Acts, Resolutions and Memorials Passed at the Several Annual Sessions of the Legislative Assembly of the Territory of Utah 63 (Henry McEwan 1866).

“Sec. 1. Be it ordained by the General Assembly of the State of Deseret: That if any person shall hereafter trade or give any guns, rifies,pistols or any other deadly weap- ons, ammunition or spirituous liquors to any Indian, without having a license, he shall, on conviction thereof before any Justice of the Peace, he fined in a sum not exceeding one hundred dollars for each offense, and also forfeit all the property received from the Indian, which shall be sold and the proceeds thereof paid into the public treasury.”




An Act to prevent the disposing of Arms, and other Warlike Implements, and Ammunition to Indians and others, in Laws of the Indiana Territory, Printed by Authority, and under the inspection of the Committee (Stout & Smoot, Printers to the Territory, 1807).

“[T]he Executive of the Territory for the time being, be, and he is hereby authorised and empowered by proclamation to prohibit the furnishing by sale, gift, or otherwise, all, & every species of war-like weapons, and impliments; ammunition or warlike stores, to any Indian or Indians, dwelling within, or without the limits or lines of the federal counties in thie Territory, when in his opinion the publick [sic] welfare and safety may require such prohibition. And be it further enacted, that any person or persons, who shall directly or indirectly, by gift, present, donation, loan, sale or otherwise furnish and provide, or have furnished and provided any Indian or Indians, with any article of ammunition, such as flints, powder ,lead or balls, or with any warlike impliments or deadly weapons, such as knives, spears, battle aces, tome-hawks, pistols, [susils, rifles, smooth bores, or muskets, contrary to the proclamation of the Executive, as aforesaid, every person or persons, so offending, shall, upon conviction by indictment or presentment, in any court of record in this Territory, be fined in any sum not exceeding one thousand dollars, be whipped publickly [sic], any number of stripes, not exceeding one hundred well laid on, and be imprisoned for a term not exceeding five years, at the discretion of the court before whom the same may be tried, and moreover, shall stand committed, after having received the stripes, until the fine and costs be paid.”




An Act concerning the Kaskaskia Indians, in Nathaniel Pope, Laws of the Territory of Illinois (1815).

That it shall not be lawful for any person whatever without license from the Governor or some sub-agent appointed by him to purchase or receive by gift or other wise of any of the before mentioned Indians, any horse mare, gun tomohaw, knife, blanket, shrouding, calico, saddle, bridle, or any goods wares or merchandize whatever, that all such sales or gifts shall be considered as fraudulent on the part of the buyer or receiver and that any whit eperson or free person of coulour whatever so buying or receiving any such articles of any one of those Indians shall be liable to pay a fine of twenty dollars to be recovered before a justice of the peace . . . .”




An act prohibiting the trading with Indians, Sec. 2, in Nathaniel Pope, Laws of the Territory of Illinois (1815).

Be it further enacted, That if any person or persons, shall purchase or receive of any Indian in the way of barter, or trade a gun or other article commonly used in hunting, or any instrument of husbandry or cooking utensil, or clothing or horse, shall forfeit and pay any sum not exceeding fifty dollars nor less than ten, to the use of the territory . . . .




An Act to prevent Indians from roaming at large throught the Territory, in Compilation of the Public Acts of the Legislative Council of the Territory of Florida, Passed Prior to 1840, at 46 (John P. Duval ed., 1839)

Sec. 1. Be it enacted . . . If any male Indian, of the years of discretion, venture to roam or ramble beyond the boundary lines of the reservations which have been assigned to the tribe or nation to which said Indian belongs, it shall and may be lawful for any person or persons to apprehend, seize, and take said Indian, and carry him before some justice of the peace, who is hereby authorized, impowered, and required, to direct . . . not exceeding thirty-nine stripes . . . moreover, to cause the gun of said Indian (if he has one) to be taken from him, and deposited with the colonel of the county, or captain of the district, in which said Indian may be taken, subject to the order of the super-intendent of Indian affairs. Sec. 2. And be it further enacted, That no general license to roam, or remain out of said limits, for the purpose of hunting, shall be received by said justice as an excuse of any Indian, when found without his assigned limits.




An Act to prevent and punish the sale of Arms and Ammunitions to Indians, Sec. 1., in The Compiled Laws of the Territory of Arizona 99 (John P. Hoyt ed., 1877).

“Sec. 1. Any person or persons within this Territory who shall sell or give arms or ammunition to any Indians, or repair arms for them, shall, upon conviction thereof, be punished as follows . . . .”




1933 Haw. Sess. Laws 39, An Act Regulating the Sale, Transfer, and Possession of Firearms and Ammunition, § 8.

§ 8. In an exceptional case, when the applicant shows good reason to fear injury to his person or property, the chief of police of the city and county of Honolulu or the sheriff of a county, other than the city and county of Honolulu, may grant a license to a citizen of the United States or a duly accredited official representative of a foreign nation, of the age of twenty years or more, to carry concealed on his person within the city and county or the county in which such license is granted, a pistol or revolver and ammunition therefor. Unless renewed, such license shall automatically become void at the expiration of one year from date of issue. No such license shall issue unless it appears that the applicant is a suitable person to be so licensed, and in no event to a person who has been convicted of a felony, or adjudged insane, in the Territory or elsewhere. All licenses to carry concealed weapons heretofore issued shall expire at midnight on the effective date of this Act. No person shall carry concealed on his person a pistol or revolver or ammunition therefor without being licensed so to do under the provisions of this section. For each such license there shall he charged a fee of ten dollars ($10.00), which shall be covered into the treasury of the city and county or the county in which such license is granted. Any person violating this section shall be punished by a fine of not more than one thousand dollars ($1,000.00) or by imprisonment for not more than one year, or by both.




1933 Or. Laws 488, An Act to Amend Sections 72-201, 72-202, 72-207, Oregon Code 1930, § 2.

On and after the date upon which this act takes effect no unnaturalized foreign-born person and no person who has been convicted of a felony against the person or property of another or against the government of the United States or the state of Oregon or of any political subdivision thereof shall own or have in his possession or under his custody or control any pistol, revolver, or other firearms capable of being concealed upon the person, or machine gun. The terms “pistol,” “revolver,” and “firearms capable of being concealed upon the person” as used in this acts shall be construed to apply to and include all firearms having a barrel less than 12 inches in length. The word “machine gun” shall be construed to be a weapon of any description by whatever name known, loaded or unloaded, from which two or more shots may be fired by a single pressure upon the trigger device. Any person who shall violate the provisions of this section shall be guilty of a felony and, upon conviction thereof, be punishable by imprisonment in the state penitentiary for not less than one nor more than five years.




1933 Haw. Sess. Laws 38, An Act Regulating the Sale, Transfer, and Possession of Firearms and Ammunition, § 6.

The possession of all firearms and ammunition shall be confined to the possessor’s place of business, residence, or sojourn, or to carriage as merchandise in a wrapper from the place of purchase to the purchaser’s home, place of business or place of sojourn, or between these places and a place of repair, or upon change of place of business, abode, or sojourn, except as provided in Sections 5 and 8; provided, however, that no person who has been convicted in this Territory or elsewhere, of having committed or attempted a crime of violence, shall own or have in his possession or under his control a pistol or revolver or ammunition therefor. Any person violating any provision of this section shall be punished by a fine of not more than one thousand dollars ($1,000.00) or by imprisonment for not more than one year, or by both.




1931 Cal. Stat. 2316–17, An Act to Control and Regulate the Possesion, Sale and use of Pistols, Revolvers, and other Firearms Capable of Being Concealed Upn the Person, ch. 1098, § 1.

… [N]o person who is not a citizen of the United States of America and no person who has been convicted of a felony under the certain laws of the United States, of the State of California, or any state or any other government or county, or who is addicted to the use of any narcotic drug or drugs shall own or have in his possession or under his custody or control any pistol, revolver or other firearm capable of being concealed upon the person . . . [a]ny person who shall violate the provisions of this section shall be punishable by imprisonment in the state prison not exceeding five years, or in a county jail not exceeding one year or by fine not exceeding five hundred dollars, or by both fine and imprisonment.




1927 Haw. Sess. Laws 209-217, AN ACT Regulating the Sale, Transfer and Possession of Certain Firearms and Ammunitions, and Amending Sections 2136, 2137, 2138, 2139, 2140, 2141, 2142, 2143, 2146 and 2147 of the Revised Laws of Hawaii 1925 (the “Small Arms Act”), § 1, § 4.

Section 1. Definitions. “Pistol” or “revolver” as used in this Act, means any firearm with barrel less than twelve inches in length. “Crime of Violence”, as used in this Act means any of the following crimes, namely, murder, manslaughter, rape, mayhem, assault to do great bodily harm, robbery, larceny, burglary and house-breaking. Section 4. Persons forbidden to possess small arms. No person who has been convicted in this territory, or elsewhere, of having committed or attempted a crime of violence, shall own or have in his possession or under his control, a pistol or revolver.




1927 R.I. Pub. Laws 256, An Act to Regulate the Possession of Firearms, §§1 and 3

§ 1. When used in this act the following words and phrases shall be construed as follows: “pistol” shall include any Pistol or revolver, and any shot gun, rifle or similar weapon with overall less than twenty-six inches, but shall not include any pistol without a magazine or any pistol or revolver designed for the use of blank cartridges only. “machine gun” shall include any weapon which shoots automatically and any weapon which shoots more than twelve shots semi-automatically without reloading. “Firearm shall include any machine gun or pistol. . . “Crime of violence” shall mean and include any of the following crimes or any attempt to commit any of the same, viz.: murder, manslaughter, rape, mayhem, assault or battery involving grave bodily injury, robbery, burglary, and breaking and entering. “sell” shall include let or hire, give, lend and transfer, and the word “purchase” shall include hire, accept and borrow, and the expression “purchasing” shall be construed accordingly. . .§ 3. No person who has been convicted in this state or elsewhere of a crime of violence shall purchase own, carry or have in his possession or under his control any firearm.




1925 W.Va. Acts 31, 1st Extraordinary Sess., An Act to Amend and Re-Enact Section Seven . . . Relating to Offenses Against the Peace . . . , ch. 3, § 7, pt. b.

No alien shall own, keep or possess any firearm of any kind or character.




1925 Nev. Stat. 54, An Act to Control and Regulate the Manufacture, Sale, Possession, Use, and Carrying of Firearms and Weapons, and other Matters Properly Relating Thereto, ch. 47, § 2.

2. On and after the date upon which this act takes effect no unnaturalized foreign-born person, and no person who has been convicted of a felony in the State of Nevada or in any one of the states of the United States of America, or in any political subdivision thereof, shall own or have in his possession or under his custody or control any pistol, revolver or other firearm capable of being concealed upon the person. The terms “pistol,” “revolver,” and “firearm capable of being concealed upon the person,” as used in this act shall be construed to apply to and include all firearms having a barrel less than twelve inches in length. Any person who shall violate the provisions of this section shall be guilty of a felony, and upon conviction thereof shall be punishable by imprisonment in a state prison for not less than one year nor for more than five years.




1925 Wyo. Sess. Laws 110, An Act Prohibiting Persons not Citizens of the United States, from Possessing, Wearing or Carrying any Dangerous or Deadly Weapon. . . , ch. 106, § 1.

Every person not being a citizen of the United States, who shall own, possess, wear or carry any dirk, pistol, shot gun, rifle, or other fire arm, bowie knife, dagger, or any other dangerous or deadly weapon, shall upon conviction thereof, be adjudged guilty of a misdemeanor and shall be fined in any sum not less than twenty-five dollars ($25.00) nor more than one hundred dollars ($100.00) or imprisoned in the county jail not more than six months, or by both such fine and imprisonment.




1923 N.D. Laws 380, Pistols and Revolvers, ch. 266, § 5.

Sec. 5. Aliens and Criminals Must Not Possess Arms. No unnaturalized foreign-born person and no person who has been convicted of a felony against the person or property of another or against the Government of the United States or of any State or subdivision thereof, shall own or have in his possession or under his control, a pistol or revolver. Violations of this section shall be punished by imprisonment for not to exceed five years.




1923 Conn. Acts 3732, Unnaturalized Persons, ch. 259, § 17.

No alien resident in the United States shall hunt, capture or kill, any bird or quadruped and no such alien shall own or be possessed of any shot gun or rifle. The presence of any shot gun or rifle upon any premises or in any building or tent within this state occupied or controlled by any alien resident of the United States, shall be prima facie evidence that such gun is owned or controlled by such alien and any such gun or rifle shall upon conviction of such person, be forfeited to the state and shall be sold. . .




1923 Conn. Pub. Acts 3708, An Act Concerning the Possession, Sale and Use of Pistols and Revolvers, ch. 252, § 7.

Sec. 7. No person, firm or corporation shall sell at retail, deliver or otherwise transfer any pistol or revolver to any alien . . .




1923 N.Y. Laws 140–141, An Act to Amend the Conservation Law in Relation to Aliens, ch. 110, § 2.

2. It shall be unlawful for any unnaturalized foreign born person to hunt for, or capture or kill, in this state any wild bird or animal, either game or otherwise, of any description except in defense of person or property or except under a special license issued directly by the conservation commission; and to that end it shall be unlawful for any unnaturalized foreign born person within this state, to own or be possessed of a shotgun or rifle of any make, unless he possess such special license.




1923 Cal. Stat. 696, An Act to Control and Regulate the Possession, Sale and Use of Pistols, Revolvers, and Other Firearms Capable of Being Concealed Upon the Person; To Prohibit the Manufacture, Sale, Possession or Carrying of Certain Other Dangerous Weapons Within this State; To Provide for Registering All Sales of Pistols, Revolvers or Other Firearms Capable of Being Concealed Upon the Person; To Prohibit the Carrying of Concealed Firearms Except by Lawfully Authorized Persons; To Provide for the Confiscation and Destruction of Such Weapons in Certain Cases; To Prohibit the Ownership, Use or Possession of Any of Such Weapons by Certain Classes of Persons; To Prescribe Penalties for Violations of This Act and Increased Penalties for Repeated Violations Hereof; To Authorize, In Proper Cases, The Granting of Licenses or Permits to Carry Firearms Concealed Upon the Person; To Provide for Licensing Retail Dealers in Such Firearms and Regulating Sales Thereunder; And To Repeal Chapter One Hundred Forty-Five of California Statutes of 1917, Relating to the Same Subject, ch. 339, § 2.

Sec. 2. On and after the date upon which this act takes effect, no unnaturalized foreign born person and no person who has been convicted of a felony against the person or property of another or against the government of the United States or of the State of California or of any political subdivision thereof shall own or have in his possession or under his custody or control any pistol, revolver or other firearm capable of being concealed upon the person. The terms “pistol,” “revolver,” and “firearms capable of being concealed upon the person” as used in this act shall be construed to apply to and include all firearms having a barrel less than twelve inches in length. Any person who shall violate the provisions of this section shall be guilty of a felony and upon conviction thereof shall be punishable by imprisonment in a state prison for not less than one year nor for more than five years.




1922 Mass. Acts 563, ch. 485, An Act Relative to the Sale and Carrying of Firearms, ch. 485, § 8 (amending § 130)

§ 8 (amending § 130). Whoever sells or furnishes to a minor under the age of fifteen, or to an unnaturalized foreign born person who has who has not a permit to carry firearms under section one hundred and thirty-one, any firearm, air gun or other dangerous weapon or ammunition therefor shall be punished by a fine of not less than ten nor more than fifty dollars, but instructors and teachers may furnish military weapons to pupils for instruction and drill.




1921 Mich. Pub. Acts 21, An Act to Give Additional Protection to Wild Birds and Animals and Game within the State of Michigan, Prohibiting the Hunting for or Capture or Killing of Such Wild Birds, or Animals, or Game, by Unnaturalized Foreign-born Residents, Forbidding the Ownership or Possession of Shotgun, or Rifle, or Pistol, or Firearms of Any Kind, by Any Unnaturalized Foreign-born Resident, within the State, and Prescribing Penalties for Violation of its Provisions, § 1.

That from and after the passage of this act it shall be unlawful for any unnaturalized foreign-born resident to hunt for or capture or kill in this state any wild bird or animals, either game or otherwise, of any description, excepting in defense of person or property; and to that end it shall be unlawful for any unnaturalized foreign-born resident within this state to either own or be possessed of a shotgun, or rifle of any make, or a pistol, or firearms of any kind. Each and every person violating any provision of this section shall, upon conviction thereof, be sentenced to pay a fine of not to exceed one hundred dollars for each offense, or be imprisoned in the county jail for a period not to exceed ninety days, or by both such fine and imprisonment, in the discretion of the court: Provided that in addition to the before named penalty, all guns or firearms of the before-mentioned kind, found in possession or under control of an unnaturalized foreign-born resident shall, upon conviction of such person, be declared forfeited to the state of Michigan, and shall be sold by the State game commissioner as hereinafter directed.