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Year: 1799

An Act establishing and regulating the militia, in Salmon Portland Chase, The Statutes of Ohio and of the Northwestern Territory, Adopted or Enacted from 1788 to 1833 inclusive: Together with the Ordinance of 1787; the Constitutions of Ohio and of the United States, and Various Public Instruments and Acts of Congress; Illustrated by a Preliminary Sketch of the History of Ohio; Numerous References and Notes and Copious Indexes. Vol. 1. Cincinnati, 1833. Available at The Making of Modern Law: Primary Sources.

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"Be it enacted . . . [t]hat each and every free, able bodied, white male citizen of the territory, who is or shall be the age of eighteen years, and under the age of forty five-years, except as is herein after excepted, shall . . . be enrolled in the m...

“Be it enacted . . . [t]hat each and every free, able bodied, white male citizen of the territory, who is or shall be the age of eighteen years, and under the age of forty five-years, except as is herein after excepted, shall . . . be enrolled in the militia . . . and every citizen, so enrolled and notified, shall, within six months thereafter, provide himself with a good musket, a sufficient bayonet and belt, or a fusee, two spare flints, a knapsack and a pouch, with a box therein, to contain not less than twenty-four cartridges, suited to the bore of his musket or susee, each cartridge to contain a proper quantity of powder and ball, or a good rifle, knapsack, pouch and powder horm, with twenty balls suited to the bore of his rifle, and a quarter of a pound of powder, and every enrolled person shall appear armed, accoutred (sic) and provided when called out to muster (sic), or in service, except when called out on company days, to exercise only, he may appear without a knapsack.”

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1799 Miss. Laws 113, A Law For The Regulation Of Slaves.

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[Slaves interdicted the carrying arms, etc.] No negro or mulatto shall keep or carry any gun, powder, shot, club or other weapon whatsoever, offensive or defensive; but all and every gun, weapon and ammunition found in the possession or custody of any ...

[Slaves interdicted the carrying arms, etc.] No negro or mulatto shall keep or carry any gun, powder, shot, club or other weapon whatsoever, offensive or defensive; but all and every gun, weapon and ammunition found in the possession or custody of any negro or mulatto may be seized by any person, and upon due proof thereof made before any justice of the peace of the county where such seizure shall be, shall by his order be forfeited to the seizor for his own use, and moreover every such offender shall have and receive by order of such justice, any number of lashes not exceeding thirty-nine, on his or her bare back, well laid on, for every such offense.

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1799 Ky. Acts 7, An Act to Amend an Act Entitled “An Act Concerning the Militia,” ch. 1, §§ 1-3.

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§ 1. . . . [T]he brigadier generals shall attend each regimental muster within their brigades to view the same; it shall be the duty of the brigade major, attended by the commandant of the regimnt, to inspect the same at every muster. § 2. Al...

§ 1. . . . [T]he brigadier generals shall attend each regimental muster within their brigades to view the same; it shall be the duty of the brigade major, attended by the commandant of the regimnt, to inspect the same at every muster. § 2. All fines arising within the bounds of any regiment, on account of delinquencies of officers, privates, or otherwise, shall be appropriated to the use of such regiment only. § 3. . . . [E]ach non-commissioned officer shall have ten days notice of each muster; and each non-commissioned officer and private, appearing on parade without a gun after being duly notified, shall be fined any sum not exceeding fifty cents, at the discretion of a court martial.

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1799 Conn Acts 511, An Act For The Militia, § 4

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That the Fines and Penalties incurred for Non-appearance and deficiencies of Arms, Ammunition and Accoutrements shall in future be as follows. Each non-commissioned Officer, Drummer, Fifer or Trumpeter who shall neglect to appear at the Time and Place ...

That the Fines and Penalties incurred for Non-appearance and deficiencies of Arms, Ammunition and Accoutrements shall in future be as follows. Each non-commissioned Officer, Drummer, Fifer or Trumpeter who shall neglect to appear at the Time and Place appointed for regimental or battalion exercise or review being legally warned thereto shall forfeit and pay a fine of three dollars for each days neglect and for each days neglect to appear at the time and place appointed for company Exercise or Inspection, being legally warned thereto, shall forfeit and pay a Fine of One Dollar and Fifty Cents, and each Private belonging to any Company of Militia, shall for Non-appearance on days of Regimental or Battalion Exercise or Review, being thereto legally warned, forfeit and pay a Fine of Two Dollars for each Day’s neglect and for Non-appearance at Time and Place for company Exercise or Inspection he shall forfeit and pay a Fine of One Dollar for each Day’s neglect; and for deficiencies of Arms, Ammunition and Accoutrements required by Law, each non-commissioned Officer and Private shall forfeit and pay for each Day of Review or Exercise the he shall be deficient, the following Fines, viz. For a Gun or pair of Pistols, each Seventy-five cents; for Sword, Bayonet or Cartridge Box, each Fifty Cents; and for each of the other Articles required by law, Twenty-five Cents.

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Meinrad Greiner, Laws and Ordinances, Ordained and Established by the Mayor, Aldermen, and Commonalty, of the City of New-York, in Common Council Convened for the Good Rule and Government of the Inhabitants and Residents of the Said City Second Edition Page 25-26, Image 25-26 (1799) available at The Making of Modern Law: Primary Sources.

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Ordinances of the City of New York, To Regulate the Keeping of Gun-powder in the City of New York: Whereas the better to secure the inhabitants of the city of New York from the dangers they have been exposed to by large quantities of gun powder being k...

Ordinances of the City of New York, To Regulate the Keeping of Gun-powder in the City of New York: Whereas the better to secure the inhabitants of the city of New York from the dangers they have been exposed to by large quantities of gun powder being kept in houses, shops and stores within the said city, a suitable and convenient magazine or powder house is erected and built at Inclemberg in the seventh ward for the reception of all the gunpowder which is or shall be imported into the said city: Therefore, Be it ordained by the Mayor, Aldermen and Commonality of the City of New York in Common council convened, That no person or persons shall keep in any house, shop store house or other place within two miles of the city hall of the said city (Magazines of powder of the United States or of this state only excepted) any more or greater quantity of gun powder at one time than twenty-eight pounds, and that in four separate stone jugs or in tin canisters, each of which shall not contain more than seven pounds weight of gun-powder, under the penalty of twelve dollars and fifty cents for every offense.

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Charles Nettleton, Laws of the State of New-Jersey Page 474, Image 501 (1821) available at The Making of Modern Law: Primary Sources.

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[An Act to Describe, Apprehend and Punish Disorderly Persons (1799)], § 2. And whereas diverse ill disposed persons are frequently apprehended, having upon them implements for house-breaking, or offensive weapons, or are found in or upon houses, w...

[An Act to Describe, Apprehend and Punish Disorderly Persons (1799)], § 2. And whereas diverse ill disposed persons are frequently apprehended, having upon them implements for house-breaking, or offensive weapons, or are found in or upon houses, warehouses, stables, barns or out-houses, areas of houses, coach-houses, smoke-houses, enclosed yards, or gardens belonging to houses, with intent to commit theft, misdemeanors or other offences; and although their evil purposes are thereby manifested, the power of the justices of the peace to demand of them sureties for their good behavior hath not been of sufficient effect to prevent them from carrying their evil purpose into execution; Be it further enacted, That if any person shall be apprehended, having upon him or her any picklock, key, crow, jack, bit or other implement, with an intent to break and enter into any dwelling-house or out-house; or shall have upon him or her any pistol, hanger, cutlass, bludgeon, or other offensive weapon, with intent to assault any person; or shall be found in or upon any dwelling-house, ware-house, stable, barn, coach-house, smoke-house or out-house, or in any enclosed yard or garden, or area belonging to any house, with an intent to steal any goods or chattels, then he or she shall be deemed and adjudged to be a disorderly person.

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