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Year: 1834

A Digest of the Statute Laws of Kentucky, of a Public and Permanent Nature, from the Commencement of the Government to the Session of the Legislature, Ending on the 24th February, 1834. With References to Judicial Decisions Page 788, Image 794 (Vol. 1, 1834) available at The Making of Modern Law: Primary Sources.

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An Act for the Better Preservation of the Breed of Deer, and Preventing unlawful Hunting, § 8. And be it further enacted by the authority aforesaid, That whosoever shall hereafter use any fire-hunting or the killing of any deer by such means on an...

An Act for the Better Preservation of the Breed of Deer, and Preventing unlawful Hunting, § 8. And be it further enacted by the authority aforesaid, That whosoever shall hereafter use any fire-hunting or the killing of any deer by such means on any patented land, every person present at such fire hunting shall forfeit and pay twenty shillings for every such offense; and if any Indian be found fire-hunting as aforesaid, it shall and may be lawful for the owner of such land, or his or her overseer, to take away the gun of such Indian, and the same to keep to his own use.

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1834 Mo. Laws 536-37, An Act to Organize Govern and Discipline the Militia, ch. 423, art. 11, pt. 5.

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Every non-commissioned officer and private, appearing without being armed and equipped as the law directs, at any parade or rendezvous, shall be sentenced to pay the following fines, namely: For want of a sufficient sword and belt, if belonging to the ...

Every non-commissioned officer and private, appearing without being armed and equipped as the law directs, at any parade or rendezvous, shall be sentenced to pay the following fines, namely: For want of a sufficient sword and belt, if belonging to the artillery or light artillery, and for want of a sufficient musket with a steel rod, or rifle, if belonging to a company of light infantry, grenadiers, riflemen or infantry, one dollar; for want of a sufficient bayonet and belt, fifty cents; for want of a pouch with a box therein, sufficient to contain twenty four cartridges suited to the bore of his musket, twenty-five cents; and whenever ordered by the commander in chief or the commandant of the division, brigade, regiment or extra battalion, so equipped as on parade; for want of two spare flints and a knapsack, twenty four cartridges, shot pouch, powder horn, twenty balls, and a quarter of a pound of powder, twenty-five cents each, but the whole number of spare flints, cartridges and balls, shall be considered each as only one deficiency, provided that no person be fined for not appearing on parade with a gun, who does not own one[.]

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The Revised Statutes of the State of Maine Passed October 22, 1840 to Which are Prefixed the Constitutions of the United States and of the State of Maine, and to Which are Subjoined the Other Public Laws of 1840 and 1841, with an Appendix Page 697, Image 713 (1841) available at The Making of Modern Law: Primary Sources.

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Section 4. If any person shall carry on the business of manufacturing gun powder, or of mixing or grinding the composition therefor, in any building within eighty rods from any valuable building, erected at the time when such business may be commenced ...

Section 4. If any person shall carry on the business of manufacturing gun powder, or of mixing or grinding the composition therefor, in any building within eighty rods from any valuable building, erected at the time when such business may be commenced the building, in which such business may be carried on as aforesaid, shall be deemed a public nuisance; and such person shall be liable to be prosecuted and indicted accordingly.

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