Duke Center for Firearms Law
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Repository of Historical Gun Laws

Year: 1840

1840 Mo. Laws 193-94, An Act To Incorporate The Rural Cemetery Association, § 7.

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Any person who shall willfully . . . shoot or discharge any gun or other fire arms within the said limits, shall be deemed guilty of a misdemeanor, and shall, upon conviction thereof before any justice of the peace, or any other court of competent juri...

Any person who shall willfully . . . shoot or discharge any gun or other fire arms within the said limits, shall be deemed guilty of a misdemeanor, and shall, upon conviction thereof before any justice of the peace, or any other court of competent jurisdiction within the county of St. Louis, be punished by a fine of not less than five dollars, nor more than fifty dollars, according to the nature and aggravation of the offence[.]

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James Iredell, A Digested Manual of the Acts of the General Assembly of North Carolina, from the Year 1838 to the Year 1846, Inclusive, Omitting All the Acts of a Private and Local Nature, and Such as were Temporary and Whose Operation Has Ceased to Exist Page 73, Image 73 (1847) available at The Making of Modern Law: Primary Sources.

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Crimes and Punishments, 1840 - 1. - Ch. 30, If any free negro, mulatto, or free person of color shall wear, or carry about his or her person, or keep in his or her house, any shot gun, musket, rifle, pistol, sword, dagger, or bowie knife, unless he or ...

Crimes and Punishments, 1840 – 1. – Ch. 30, If any free negro, mulatto, or free person of color shall wear, or carry about his or her person, or keep in his or her house, any shot gun, musket, rifle, pistol, sword, dagger, or bowie knife, unless he or she shall have obtained a license therefor from the Court of Pleas and Quarter Sessions of his or her county, within one year preceding the wearing, keeping or carrying thereof, he or she shall be guilty of a misdemeanor and may be indicted therefor.

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Volney Erskine Howard, The Statutes of the State of Mississippi of a Public and General Nature, with the Constitutions of the United States and of this State: And an Appendix Containing Acts of Congress Affecting Land Titles, Naturalization, &c, and a Manual for Clerks, Sheriffs and Justices of the Peace Page 676, Image 688 (1840) available at The Making of Modern Law: Primary Sources.

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Crimes, Misdemeanors and Criminal Prosecution, § 55. If any person having or carrying any dirk, dirk knife, Bowie knife, sword, sword cane, or other deadly weapon, shall, in the presence of three or more persons, exhibit the same in a rude, angry ...

Crimes, Misdemeanors and Criminal Prosecution, § 55. If any person having or carrying any dirk, dirk knife, Bowie knife, sword, sword cane, or other deadly weapon, shall, in the presence of three or more persons, exhibit the same in a rude, angry and threatening manner, not in necessary self-defense, or shall in any manner unlawfully use the same in any fight or quarrel, the person or persons so offending, upon conviction thereof in the circuit or criminal court of the proper county, shall be fined in a sum not exceeding five hundred dollars, and be imprisoned not exceeding three months.

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The Revised Statutes of the State of Maine, Passed October 22, 1840; To Which are Prefixed the Constitutions of the United States and of the State of Maine, and to Which Are Subjoined the Other Public Laws of 1840 and 1841, with an Appendix Page 709, Image 725 (1847) available at The Making of Modern Law: Primary Sources.

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Justices of the Peace, § 16. Any person, going armed with any dirk, dagger, sword, pistol, or other offensive and dangerous weapon, without a reasonable cause to fear an assault on himself, or any of his family or property, may, on the complaint o...

Justices of the Peace, § 16. Any person, going armed with any dirk, dagger, sword, pistol, or other offensive and dangerous weapon, without a reasonable cause to fear an assault on himself, or any of his family or property, may, on the complaint of any person having cause to fear an injury or breach of the peace, be required to find sureties for keeping the peace for a term, not exceeding one year, with the right of appeal as before provided.

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The Laws of Texas 1822-1897 Austin’s Colonization Law and Contract; Mexican Constitution of 1824; Federal Colonization Law; Colonization Laws of Coahuila and Texas; Colonization Law of State of Tamaulipas; Fredonian Declaration of Independence; Laws and Decrees, with Constitution of Coahuila and Texas; San Felipe Convention; Journals of the Consultation; Proceedings of the General Council; Goliad Declaration of Independence; Journals of the Convention at Washington; Ordinances and Decrees of the Consultation; Declaration of Independence; Constitution of the Republic; Laws, General and Special, of the Republic; Annexation Resolution of the United States; Ratification of the same by Texas; Constitution of the United States; Constitutions of the State of Texas, with All the Laws, General and Special, Passed Thereunder, including Ordinances, Decrees, and Resolutions, with the Constitution of the Confederate States and the Reconstruction Acts of Congress Page 172, Image 349 (Vol. 2, 1898) available at The Making of Modern Law: Primary Sources.

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Laws of the Republic of Texas, [An Act Concerning Slaves (1840),] § 6. Be it further enacted, That no slave in this Republic shall carry a gun or other deadly weapon without the written consent of his master, mistress or overseer; such arms or oth...

Laws of the Republic of Texas, [An Act Concerning Slaves (1840),] § 6. Be it further enacted, That no slave in this Republic shall carry a gun or other deadly weapon without the written consent of his master, mistress or overseer; such arms or other weapons shall be liable to be taken by any person from any such negro, and all such property forfeited, if it does not exceed ten dollars in value; but any such property may be reclaimed by the owner on paying ten dollars to the person who may have so taken the same.

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