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1859 Wash. Sess. Laws 119, An Act Relative to Crimes and Punishment, and Proceedings in Criminal Cases, ch. 5, § 76.

Every person who shall convey into any penitentiary, jail or house of correction, or house of reformation, any disguise, or any instrument, tool, weapon or other thing, adapted to, or useful, in aiding any prisoner there, lawfully committed or detained, to make escape . . . shall, on conviction thereof, be imprisoned in the penitentiary not more than four years, nor less than one year, or imprisoned in the county jail any length of time not exceeding one year, and be fined in any sum not exceeding five hundred dollars.




Joseph Rockwell Swan, The Revised Statutes of the State of Ohio, of a General Nature, in Force August 1, 1860. With Notes of the Decisions of the Supreme Court Page 452, Image 464 (1860) available at The Making of Modern Law: Primary Sources.

An Act to Prohibit the Carrying or Wearing of Concealed Weapons, Section 1. Be it enacted by the General Assembly of the State of Ohio, that whoever shall carry a weapon or weapons, concealed on or about his person, such as a pistol, bowie knife, dirk, or any other dangerous weapon, shall be deemed guilty of a misdemeanor, and on conviction of the first offense shall be fined not exceeding two hundred dollars, or imprisoned in the county jail not more than thirty days; and for the second offense, not exceeding five hundred dollars, or imprisoned in the county jail not more than three months, or both, at the discretion of the court. Sec. 2. If it shall be proved to the jury, from the testimony on the trial of any case presented under the [section of this act banning the carrying of concealed weapons], that the accused was, at the time of carrying any of the weapon or weapons aforesaid, engaged in the pursuit of any lawful business, calling, or employment, and that the circumstances in which he was placed at the time aforesaid were such as to justify a prudent man in carrying the weapon or weapons aforesaid for the defense of his person, property or family, the jury shall acquit the accused.




D. T. Valentine, Ordinances of the Mayor, Aldermen and Commonalty of the City of New York: Revised A. D. 1859 Adopted by the Common Council Page 235, Image 243 (1859) available at The Making of Modern Law: Primary Sources.

Ordinances of the City of New York. Firing of Fire-Arms, Cannons and Fireworks. § 6. No tavern-keeper, keeper of a public house, garden or place of resort, nor any other person, shall suffer or permit any person to practice with or fire off any pistol, gun, fowling-piece or other fire-arms, in or upon his or her premises, nor shall suffer or permit any pistol gallery, erected in his or her house, or upon his or her premises, to be used for the purpose of practicing with any pistol gun, fowling-piece or other fire-arms, upon the first day of the week, called Sunday, under the penalty of fifty dollars for each offense, to be sued for and recovered from the person keeping such public house, tavern, public garden, pistol gallery, place of resort or premises; and also the further penalty of fifty dollars for each offense, to be sued for and recovered from the person firing off or practicing with a pistol, gun, fowling-piece, or other fire-arms; and in case of such person so offending shall be an apprentice, such penalty shall be sued for and recovered from the master of such apprentice, or in case such person so offending shall be a minor and not an apprentice, the same shall be sued for and recovered from the father of, or in case of the death of the father, then from the mother or guardian of such minor.




1859 N.M. Laws 94, § 1-2.

§ 1. That from and after the passage of this act, it shall be unlawful for any person to carry concealed weapons on their persons, of any class of pistols whatever, bowie knife (cuchillo de cinto), Arkansas toothpick, Spanish dagger, slung-shot, or any other deadly weapon, of whatever class or description they may be, no matter by what name they may be known or called, under the penalities and punishment which shall hereinafter be described. § 2. Be it further enacted: That if any person shall carry about his person, either concealed or otherwise, any deadly weapon of the class and description mentioned in the preceeding section, the person or persons who shall so offend, on conviction, which shall be by indictment in the district court, shall be fined in any sum not less than fifty dollars, nor more than one hundred dollars, at the discretion of the court trying the cause, on the first conviction under this act; and for the second conviction, the party convicted shall be imprisoned in the county jail for a term of not less than three months, nor more than one year, also at the discretion of the court trying the cause.




William Stanley, Charter and Ordinances of the City of Leavenworth Page 76, Image 77 (1859) available at The Making of Modern Law: Primary Sources.

Ordinances of Leavenworth, KS; An Ordinance Relating to Misdemeanors, § 4. For discharging any fire-arms, setting off fire-crackers or squibs, throwing any fire-ball or other combustible substance, or making bonfires within the limits of the city, a fine not less than three, nor more than twenty-five dollars; Provided, that this section shall not apply nor be in force on the first day of January, of the fourth day of July of each year, and provided farther, that this section may be suspended on other days by the mayor; neither shall this section apply to persons authorized to keep a pistol gallery, nor to any gunsmith who may carefully discharge fire-arms in the prosecution of his trade, nor shall it apply to the shooting of dogs running at large in violation of the city ordinances.




1859 Ohio Laws 56, An Act to Prohibit the Carrying or Wearing of Concealed Weapons, § 1.

[W]hoever shall carry a weapon or weapons, concealed on or about his person, such as a pistol, bowie knife, dirk, or any other dangerous weapon, shall be deemed guilty of a misdemeanor, and on conviction of the first offense shall be fined not exceeding two hundred dollars, or imprisoned in the county jail not more than thirty days; and for the second offense, not exceeding five hundred dollars, or imprisoned in the county jail not more than three months, or both, at the discretion of the court.




Joel Parker, The General Statutes of the Commonwealth of Massachusetts: Revised by Commissioners Appointed under a Resolve of February 16, 1856, Amended by the Legislature, and Passed December 28, 1859. to Which the Constitutions of the United States and the Commonwealth of Massachusetts are Prefixed; and a List of Acts Previously Repealed, a Glossary, and Index, are Added Page 107, Image 122 (1859) available at The Making of Modern Law: Primary Sources.

Militia — Discipline, &c. § 113. A soldier who unnecessarily, or without order from a superior officer, comes to any parade, with his musket, rifle, or pistol, loaded with ball, slug, or shot, or so loads the same while on parade, or unnecessarily, or without order from a superior officer, discharges the same when going to, returning from, or upon parade, shall forfeit not less than five nor more than twenty dollars, to be recovered on complaint of the clerk, one-half to his use and one-half to the use of commanding officer.




A Municipal Register of the City of Concord, Containing the City Charter and Ordinances, the Rules of the City Council, and a List of the City Officers Page 74, Image 75 (1868) available at The Making of Modern Law: Primary Sources.

[Ordinances of the City of Concord,] An Ordinance to Guard Against Damage to the Property of the City, Be it ordained by the City Council of the City of Concord, as follows: §1. No person shall discharge any gun or fire-arms within, on, or at, any bridge or building belonging to the city, or in any way damage the same, or any fence or other property belonging to the city, or write upon, cut out, or make any obscene image or representation. § 2. Any person violating any of the provisions of this ordinance shall be subject to a fine of not less than one nor more than ten dollars.




William Stanley, City Attorney, Charter and Ordinances of the City of Leavenworth Page 42, Image 43 (1859) available at The Making of Modern Law: Primary Sources.

An Ordinance Relating to Concealed Weapons, §1. That hereafter it shall be unlawful to carry any concealed weapons within the limits of this city. § 2. That any person guilty of carrying a pistol, dirk, bowie-knife, colt, slung-shot, brass, lead or iron knuckles, or any other deadly weapon within the city of Leavenworth, shall, upon conviction, be fined not less than five, nor more than two hundred dollars. This ordinance to take effect after its passage.