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Year: 1878

1878 S.C. Acts 724, An Act to Amend An Act To Prevent Fishing With Nets In The Fresh Water Streams Of This State At Certain Seasons Of The Year

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It shall not be lawful for any person on the Counties of Horry, Marion, Darlington, Clarendon, Chesterfield, Georgetown, Marlboro, and Williamsburg to fish with nets or gigs, or set traps, or shoot fish with any kind of gun, in any of the fresh water r...

It shall not be lawful for any person on the Counties of Horry, Marion, Darlington, Clarendon, Chesterfield, Georgetown, Marlboro, and Williamsburg to fish with nets or gigs, or set traps, or shoot fish with any kind of gun, in any of the fresh water rivers, creeks, lakes or other streams in said Counties, between the first day of May and the first day of September in any year hereafter.

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1878 Miss. Laws 176, An Act To Prevent The Carrying Of Concealed Weapons And For Other Purposes, ch. 46, § 4.

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[A]ny student of any university, college or school, who shall carry concealed, in whole or in part, any weapon of the kind or description in the first section of this Act described, or any teacher, instructor, or professor who shall, knowingly, suffer ...

[A]ny student of any university, college or school, who shall carry concealed, in whole or in part, any weapon of the kind or description in the first section of this Act described, or any teacher, instructor, or professor who shall, knowingly, suffer or permit any such weapon to be carried by any student or pupil, shall be deemed guilty of a misdemeanor, and, on conviction, be fined not exceeding three hundred dollars, and if the fine and costs are not paid, condemned to hard labor under the direction of the board of supervisors or of the court.

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William. M. Caswell, Revised Charter and Compiled Ordinances and Resolutions of the City of Los Angeles Page 85, Image 83 (1878) available at The Making of Modern Law: Primary Sources.

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Ordinances of the City of Los Angeles, § 36. In future, no persons, except peace officers, and persons actually traveling, and immediately passing through Los Angeles city, shall wear or carry any dirk, pistol, sword in a cane, slung-shot, or othe...

Ordinances of the City of Los Angeles, § 36. In future, no persons, except peace officers, and persons actually traveling, and immediately passing through Los Angeles city, shall wear or carry any dirk, pistol, sword in a cane, slung-shot, or other dangerous or deadly weapon, concealed or otherwise, within the corporate limits of said city, under a penalty of not more than one hundred dollars fine, and imprisonment at the discretion of the Mayor, not to exceed ten days. It is hereby made the duty of each police officer of this city, when any stranger shall come within said corporate limits wearing or carrying weapons, to, as soon as possible, give them information and warning of this ordinance; and in case they refuse or decline to obey such warning by depositing their weapons in a place of safety, to complain of them immediately.

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1878 Miss. Laws 175-76, An Act To Prevent The Carrying Of Concealed Weapons And For Other Purposes, ch. 46, §§ 2-3.

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§ 2. It shall not be lawful for any person to sell to any minor or person intoxicated, knowing him to be a minor or in a state of intoxication, any weapon of the kind or description in the first section of this Act described [pistols, various kniv...

§ 2. It shall not be lawful for any person to sell to any minor or person intoxicated, knowing him to be a minor or in a state of intoxication, any weapon of the kind or description in the first section of this Act described [pistols, various knives etc.], or any pistol cartridge, and on conviction shall be punished by a fine not exceeding two hundred dollars, and if the fine and costs are not paid, be condemned to hard labor under the direction of the board of supervisors or of the court, not exceeding six months. § 3. Any father, who shall knowingly suffer or permit any minor son under the age of sixteen years to carry concealed, in whole or in part, any weapon of the kind or description in the first section of this act described [pistols, knives, etc.], shall be deemed guilty of a misdemeanor, and on conviction, shall be fined not less than twenty dollars, nor more than two hundred dollars, and if the fine and costs are not paid, shall be condemned to hard labor under the direction of the board of supervisors or of the court.

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1878 Ohio Laws 199, An Act to Amend, Revise, and Consolidate the Statutes Relating to Municipal Corporations, to Be Known as Title Twelve, Part One, of the Act to Revise and Consolidate the General Statutes of Ohio, div. 3, ch. 3, § 1, pt. 14.

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To regulate the transportation and keeping of gunpowder, and other explosive and dangerous combustibles, and to provide or license magazines for the same.

1878 Iowa Acts 108, Military Code of Iowa, chap. 125, § 1.

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That all able-bodied male citizens of the state, between the ages of eighteen and forty-five years, who are not exempted from military duty according to the laws of the United States shall constitute the military force of this state.

1878 Or. Laws 136, An Act to Incorporate the Town of Independence, in the County of Polk, and State of Oregon, § 4.

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[T]o regulate the storage of gunpowder and other combustible material, and the use of candles, lamps and other lights in shops, halls and other places[.]

1878 Cal Stat. 117, An Act Amending Section Four Hundred and Fifteen of the Penal Code, in Relation to Crimes Against The Public Peace, ch. CCXCIX, § 1.

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Every person who maliciously and willfully disturbs the peace or quiet of any neighborhood or person, by loud or unusual noise, or by tumultuous or offensive conduct, or threatening, traducing, quarreling, challenging to fight, or fighting, or who, on ...

Every person who maliciously and willfully disturbs the peace or quiet of any neighborhood or person, by loud or unusual noise, or by tumultuous or offensive conduct, or threatening, traducing, quarreling, challenging to fight, or fighting, or who, on the public streets of any unincorporated town or upon the public highways of any unincorporated town, or upon the public highway in such unincorporated town, or upon the public highways in such unincorporated town, run any horse race, either for a wager or for amusement, or fire any gun or pistol in such unincorporated town, or use any vulgar, profane or indecent language . . . shall be punished by fine not exceeding two hundred dollars, or by imprisonment in the County Jail for not more than ninety days, or by both fine and imprisonment, or either, at the discretion of the court.

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1878 Miss. Laws 175, An Act To Prevent The Carrying Of Concealed Weapons And For Other Purposes, ch. 46, § 1.

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That any person not being threatened with, or having good and sufficient reason to apprehend an attack, or traveling (not being a tramp) or setting out on a long journey, or peace officers, or deputies in discharge of their duties, who carries conceale...

That any person not being threatened with, or having good and sufficient reason to apprehend an attack, or traveling (not being a tramp) or setting out on a long journey, or peace officers, or deputies in discharge of their duties, who carries concealed, in whole or in part, any bowie knife, pistol, brass knuckles, slung shot or other deadly weapon of like kind or description, shall be deemed guilty of a misdemeanor, and on conviction, shall be punished for the first offense by a fine of not less than five dollars nor more than one hundred dollars, and in the event the fine and cost are not paid shall be required to work at hard labor under the direction of the board of supervisors or of the court, not exceeding two months, and for the second or any subsequent offence, shall, on conviction, be fined not less than fifty nor more than two hundred dollars, and if the fine and costs are not paid, be condemned to hard labor not exceeding six months under the direction of the board of supervisors, or of the court. That in any proceeding under this section, it shall not be necessary for the State to allege or prove any of the exceptions herein contained, but the burden of proving such exception shall be on the accused.

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