Duke Center for Firearms Law
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Repository of Historical Gun Laws

Year: 1881

Egbert Jamieson, The Municipal Code of Chicago: Comprising the Laws of Illinois Relating to the City of Chicago, and the Ordinances of the City Council; Codified and Revised Page 301-304, Image 309-312 (1881) available at The Making of Modern Law: Primary Sources.

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Ordinances of Chicago, § 1264. No person shall keep, sell or give away any gunpowder or gun-cotton in any quantity, without permission in writing, signed by the mayor and city clerk, and sealed with the corporate seal, under a penalty of twenty-fi...

Ordinances of Chicago, § 1264. No person shall keep, sell or give away any gunpowder or gun-cotton in any quantity, without permission in writing, signed by the mayor and city clerk, and sealed with the corporate seal, under a penalty of twenty-five dollars for every offense: Provided, any person may keep for his own use a quantity of gunpowder or guncotton not exceeding one pound. . . § 1271. It shall be unlawful for any person or persons to carry or convey any gunpowder or guncotton (exceeding fifty pounds in quantity) through any street, alley, highway or road in the city, or within one miles of the limits thereof, in any cart, carriage, wagon, dray or wheelbarrow, or otherwise, unless the said gunpowder or guncotton be secured in tight cases or kegs well headed and hooped, and put into and entirely covered with a good tight and substantial leather bag sufficient to prevent the same from being spilled or scattered or unless the same is put into a well covered and perfectly water tight box, the bottom and sides which shall be completely covered with zinc, or unless such gunpowder or guncotton be secured in water tight patent metallic cases or kegs. . . § 1275. Any person or persons, corporation or corporations, violating any of the provisions of sections (storage, manufacturing and sale §§) shall be subject to a fine of not less than fifty dollars, and not exceeding two hundred dollars, for each and every offense, and each and every day that gunpowder or guncotton shall be kept in any place contrary to any provision of this article shall constitute a violation thereof. § 1276. No vessel laden in whole or in part with gunpowder or guncotton shall land or make fast to any dock or wharf upon the Chicago river, or either branch thereof between the south line of the school section and Chicago avenue, or discharge such gunpowder or guncotton within said limits. If any master or owner of any vessel or other person shall violate any provision of this section he shall be subject to a fine of not less than twenty dollars, and not exceeding one hundred dollars.

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Act of June 10, 1881, § 1

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makes any person, “who shall knowingly and willfully sell or cause to be sold, to any person under sixteen years of age, any cannon, revolver, pistol or other such deadly weapon, ... shall, in every such case, be guilty of a misdemeanor, and upon...

makes any person, “who shall knowingly and willfully sell or cause to be sold, to any person under sixteen years of age, any cannon, revolver, pistol or other such deadly weapon, … shall, in every such case, be guilty of a misdemeanor, and upon conviction thereof shall be sentenced to pay a fine not exceeding three hundred dollars.”

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1881 Ark. Acts 191, An Act to Preserve the Public Peace and Prevent Crime, chap. XCVI (96), § 1.

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That any person who shall wear or carry, in any manner whatever, as a weapon, any dirk or bowie knife, or a sword, or a spear in a cane, brass or metal knucks, razor, or any pistol of any kind whatever, except such pistols as are used in the army or na...

That any person who shall wear or carry, in any manner whatever, as a weapon, any dirk or bowie knife, or a sword, or a spear in a cane, brass or metal knucks, razor, or any pistol of any kind whatever, except such pistols as are used in the army or navy of the United States, shall be guilty of a misdemeanor.

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James S. Frazer, Commissioner, The Revised Statutes of Indiana: Containing, Also, the United States and Indiana Constitutions and an Appendix of Historical Documents Page 371-372, Image 393-394 (Vol. 1, 1881) available at The Making of Modern Law: Primary Sources.

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Carrying Dangerous Weapon, § 1985. Every person, not being a traveler, who shall wear or carry any dirk, pistol, bowie-knife, dagger, sword-in-cane, or any other dangerous or deadly weapon concealed, or who shall carry or wear any such weapon open...

Carrying Dangerous Weapon, § 1985. Every person, not being a traveler, who shall wear or carry any dirk, pistol, bowie-knife, dagger, sword-in-cane, or any other dangerous or deadly weapon concealed, or who shall carry or wear any such weapon openly, with the intent or avowed purpose of injuring his fellow- man, shall, upon conviction thereof, be fined in any sum not exceeding five hundred dollars. Note 1. Found constitutional in State v. Mitchell, 3 Blackf. 229.

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J. H Johnston, The Revised Charter and Ordinances of the City of Boonville, Mo. Revised and Collated, A.D.1881 Page 91, Image 91 (1881) available at The Making of Modern Law: Primary Sources.

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Offences Affecting the Public Peace § 6. If any person shall carry concealed upon or about his person any pistol, revolver, dirk, dagger, slungshot, knuckles of metal, or other deadly or dangerous weapon, within said city, or shall, in the presenc...

Offences Affecting the Public Peace § 6. If any person shall carry concealed upon or about his person any pistol, revolver, dirk, dagger, slungshot, knuckles of metal, or other deadly or dangerous weapon, within said city, or shall, in the presence of any one, exhibit such weapon in a rude, angry or threatening manner, or shall have or carry any such weapon upon or about his person while intoxicated, he shall upon conviction thereof be fined not less than five nor more than ninety dollars: Provided, That nothing herein contained shall prevent any police officer, or any officer or person whose duty it is to execute process or warrants, or to suppress breaches of the peace or make arrests, from carrying such weapons in the necessary discharge of his duty.

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Ordinances of Ogden City, Utah. To Which are Prefixed a List of the City Governments from 1869 to 1881, the Charter of the City and Amendments Page 98, Image 98 (1881) available at The Making of Modern Law: Primary Sources.

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Ordinances [of the City of Ogden, Utah], § 38. Any person discharging any gun or pistol within the limits of the city, between the hours of sunset and sunrise, or on the Sabbath day (except in case of necessary defense of self, family or property,...

Ordinances [of the City of Ogden, Utah], § 38. Any person discharging any gun or pistol within the limits of the city, between the hours of sunset and sunrise, or on the Sabbath day (except in case of necessary defense of self, family or property, or in the case of any civil officer in the discharge of his duty), shall be liable to a fine in any sum not exceeding twenty-five dollars for every such offense. § 39. Any person discharging firearms within the city, without a lawful breastwork for the protection of the citizens, or at any time other than as mentioned in the next preceding section, shall be liable to a fine not exceeding ten dollars for every such offense. § 40. A breastwork or battery for target shooting, to be deemed lawful, shall be a wall eighteen inches thick, six feet high in the back, feet wide, with side wings one foot thick, each extending two feet, increasing flaringly to the front, and six feet high, of adobies, brick or mud, or an equivalent thereto of any other material.

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Michael John Sullivan, The Revised Ordinance of the City of St. Louis, Together with the Constitution of the United States, Constitution of the State of Missouri, the Scheme for the Separation of the Governments of the City and County of St. Louis, the Charter of the City, and a Digest of the Laws Applicable to the City Page 635, Image 643 (1881) available at The Making of Modern Law: Primary Sources.

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Protection of Birds. § 3. No person shall throw from his hand any fragment of stone, wood, metal or other missile capable of inflicting injury, in any street, alley, walk or park of the city of St. Louis, or use or have in his possession ready for...

Protection of Birds. § 3. No person shall throw from his hand any fragment of stone, wood, metal or other missile capable of inflicting injury, in any street, alley, walk or park of the city of St. Louis, or use or have in his possession ready for use in any street, alley, walk or park of the city of St. Louis, any sling, cross bow and arrow, air gun or other contrivance for ejecting, discharging or throwing any fragment, bolt, arrow, pellet, or other missile of stone, metal, wood or other substance capable of inflicting injury or annoyance.

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Charles Wheeler, By-Laws of the Village of Mechanicville. Adopted by the Trustees October 18, 1881 Page 7, Image 8 (1881) available at The Making of Modern Law: Primary Sources.

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[Ordinances of the Village of Mechanicville, NY,] Fires and Their Prevention, Fire Arms and Fire Works, § 20. No person, except on the anniversary of our national independence, and on that day only, at such place or places as the President or Trus...

[Ordinances of the Village of Mechanicville, NY,] Fires and Their Prevention, Fire Arms and Fire Works, § 20. No person, except on the anniversary of our national independence, and on that day only, at such place or places as the President or Trustees shall permit, shall fire, discharge or set off, in the village, any gun, cannon, pistol, rocket, squib, cracker or fire ball, under the penalty of five dollars for each offense.

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William Lair Hill, Ballinger’s Annotated Codes and Statutes of Washington, Showing All Statutes in Force, Including the Session Laws of 1897 Page 1956, Image 731 (Vol. 2, 1897) available at The Making of Modern Law: Primary Sources.

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Flourishing Dangerous Weapon, etc. Every person who shall in a manner likely to cause terror to the people passing, exhibit or flourish, in the streets of an incorporated city or unincorporated town, any dangerous weapon, shall be deemed guilty of a mi...

Flourishing Dangerous Weapon, etc. Every person who shall in a manner likely to cause terror to the people passing, exhibit or flourish, in the streets of an incorporated city or unincorporated town, any dangerous weapon, shall be deemed guilty of a misdemeanor, and on conviction thereof shall be punished by a fine in any sum not exceeding twenty-five dollars. Justices of the peace shall have exclusive original jurisdiction of all offenses arising under the last two preceding sections.

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George S. Diossy, The Statute Law of the State of New York: Comprising the Revised Statutes and All Other Laws of General Interest, in Force January 1, 1881, Arranged Alphabetically According to Subjects Page 321, Image 324 (Vol. 1, 1881) available at The Making of Modern Law: Primary Sources.

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Offenses Against Public Decency; Malicious Mischief, and Other Crimes not Before Enumerated, Concealed Weapons, § 9. Every person who shall within this state use, or attempt to use, or with intent to use against any other person, shall knowingly a...

Offenses Against Public Decency; Malicious Mischief, and Other Crimes not Before Enumerated, Concealed Weapons, § 9. Every person who shall within this state use, or attempt to use, or with intent to use against any other person, shall knowingly and secretly conceal on his person, or with like intent shall willfully and furtively possess any instrument or weapon of the kind commonly known as a slung-shot, billy, sand club or metal knuckles, and any dirk shall be deemed guilty of felony, and on conviction thereof may be punished by imprisonment in the state prison, or penitentiary or county jail, for a term not more than one year, or by a fine not exceeding five hundred dollars, or by both such fine and imprisonment.

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