1

Constitution & Laws of the Institution of Learning Under the Care of the Mississippi Presbytery, Oakland College (Miss.), at 10 (1831)

Chapter XI. Of Misdemeanors, Offences and Punishments. 

Sec. 1. Neglect of study-interrupting the studies of others-profaneness-playing at games of cards or chance-duelling, or aiding or abetting it-wearing or carrying a dirk or other deadly weapon-intemperance in any degree-keeping company with persons of known immoral character-resorting to places of expensive amusement, & every other species of immoral conduct, of which the Faculty are the sole judges, are offences; and shall be punished as hereinafter directed.

Full Text: Google Books




R.H. Thompson, The Annotated Code of the General Statute Laws of the State of Mississippi 327, § 1030 (1892)

1030 (2988). The same; college students not to have, etc.-A student of any university, college, or school, who shall carry, bring, receive, own, or have on the campus, college or school grounds, or within two miles thereof, any weapon the carrying of which concealed is prohibited, or a teacher, instructor, or professor who shall knowingly suffer or permit any such weapon to be carried, or so brought, received, owned, or had by a student or pupil, shall be guilty of a misdemeanor, and, on conviction, be fined not exceeding three hundred dollars or imprisoned in the county jail not exceeding three months, or both.

Full Text:  HeinOnline (subscription required) [General] [Remote]




1926 Miss. Laws 272, An Act Defining the Crime of Burglary with Explosives and Providing the Punishment Therefor, ch. 176, §§ 1-2.

§ 1. [A]ny person, who, with intent to commit crime, breaks and enters, either by day or by night, any building, whether inhabited or not, and opens or attempts to open any vault, safe or other secure place by the use of nitroglycerine, dynamite, gunpowder or any other explosive, shall be deemed guilty of burglary with explosives. § 2. Any person duly convicted of burglary with explosives shall be punished by imprisonment for a term of not less than twenty-five nor more than forty years.




1924 Miss. Laws 554, An Act Creating Bird and Game Sanctuaries, Providing That Parks and Play Grounds of Certain Dimensions Shall Constitute Such Sanctuaries, and For the Protection of Birds and Game Therein, ch. 323, § 2.

It shall be unlawful for any person to hunt with gun or dog on any sanctuary or preserve for birds and game, or to rob or destroy the nests of any birds, or to catch, snare, trap, or net any birds within any such prescribed limits, and any person found with gun or dog on or within such prescribed limits, shall be prima facie presumed to be hunting in violation of this act.




1922 Miss. Laws 235, An Act . . . to Protect and Preserve Game and Fish to Conserve Same for the Use and Consumption of the Inhabitants . . . , ch. 181, § 10(b).

It shall be unlawful for any person to shoot wild water fowl with any shotgun of larger bore than number ten, or with any rifle or any gun which can be shot from the shoulder.




1906 Miss. Laws 367, Privilege Taxes, ch. 114, § 3887.

Dealers in Deadly Weapons: On each person or firm dealing in pistols, dirk knives, sword canes, brass or metallic knuckles, or other deadly weapons (shotguns and rifles excepted) – 100.00. And which shall be in addition to all and any other taxes or privileges paid. On each firm or dealer selling air guns, target or flobert rifles (and this shall apply even if the same has a license to sell merchandise, pistols or cartridges) – $25.00.




1900 Miss. Laws 51-52, An Act to Amend Chapter 32 of the Acts of 1894 Relating to Personal Assessment Rolls, ch. 49, § 1.

The auditor of the public accounts shall, by the first day of February in each year, furnish the clerk of the board of supervisors of each county with three copies of blank assessment rolls, and counties having two judicial districts shall be furnished with four copies; said roll shall be made of good paper, neatly and substantially bound and properly ruled and headed for the assessment of personal property and polls, in which to enter the following items: . . . sixteenth column, number of guns over one; seventeenth column, number of pistols, bowieknives, dirks or sword canes[.]




1898 Miss. Laws 22, An Act Creating Privilege Taxes On Certain Industries In Mississippi, ch. 5, § 63.

Pistol Cartridges: On each firm or dealer in pisol cartridges, capable of being fired in pistols or out of shells, for the manufacture of same – 5.00.




Robert Harvey. Thompson, The Annotated Code of the General Statute Laws of the State of Mississippi Page 367, Image 371 (1892) available at The Making of Modern Law: Primary Sources.

Pistols, toy; Sale of and of Cartridges or Caps for Prohibited, § 1247. If any person shall sell, or offer or expose for sale, any toy pistol, or cartridges or caps, or other contrivance by which such pistols are fired or made to cause an explosion, he shall be guilty of a misdemeanor, and on conviction, shall be punished by fine not less than five dollars nor more than twenty five dollars or imprisonment in the county jail not less than three days nor more than thirty days, or both.




Miss. Const. of 1890, art. III, § 12.

The right of every citizen to keep and bear arms in defense of his home, person or property, or in aid of the civil power when thereto legally summoned, shall not be called in question, but the legislature may regulate or forbid carrying concealed weapons.




Josiah A.Patterson Campbell, The Revised Code of the Statute Laws of the State of Mississippi: With References to Decisions of the High Court of Errors and Appeals, and of the Supreme Court, Applicable to the Statutes Page 775, Image 775 (1880) available at The Making of Modern Law: Primary Sources.

[Crimes and Misdemeanors, §2983. If any person assaults and beats another with a cowhide, whip or stick, having at the time in his possession a pistol or other deadly weapon, with intent to intimidate the person assaulted, and prevent him from defending himself, he shall on conviction be imprisoned in the penitentiary not longer than ten years.]




1886 Miss. Laws 19, An Act To Amend § 557 and 585, Code of 1880, so as to Increase the Public Revenue, and Provide for the Faithful Collection of the Same, ch. 2, § 1.

[Shooting Galleries]. On each shooting gallery or target, gun, or similar contrivance, by whatsoever name called – 25.00.




1884 Miss. Laws 412, An Act To Amend And Reduce One Act The Act Incorporating The City Of Columbus And The Several Acts Amendatory Thereto, ch. 390, § 24, pt. 16.

To regulate and prevent the storage of cotton, hay, gun powder, oil or any other combustible, explosive or inflammable [sic] material or substance; or of any material or substance offensive to public comfort or injurious to health.




Josiah A. Patterson Campbell, The Revised Code of the Statute Laws of the State of Mississippi: With References to Decisions of the High Court of Errors and Appeals, and of the Supreme Court, Applicable to the Statutes Page 776, Image 776 (1880) available at The Making of Modern Law: Primary Sources.

Carrying Concealed Weapons, §2985. Any person, not being threatened with, or having good and sufficient reason to apprehend an attack, or travelling (not being a tramp) or setting out on a journey, or a peace officer, or deputy in discharge of his duties, who carries concealed, in whole or in part, any bowie knife, pistol, brass or metallic knuckles, slung-shot, or other deadly weapon of like kind or description, shall be deemed guilty of a misdemeanor, and on conviction, shall be punished by fine not exceeding one hundred dollars, and in the event the fine and costs are not paid, shall be required to work at hard labor under the direction of the board of supervisors or of the court, not exceeding two months, and for the second or any subsequent offence, shall, on conviction, be fined not less than fifty nor more than two hundred dollars, and if the fine and costs are not paid, be condemned to hard labor not exceeding six months, as above provided, and in any proceeding under this section, it shall not be necessary for the state to allege or prove any of the exceptions herein contained, but the burden of proving such exception shall be on the accused.




Josiah A.Patterson Campbell, The Revised Code of the Statute Laws of the State of Mississippi: With References to Decisions of the High Court of Errors and Appeals, and of the Supreme Court, Applicable to the Statutes Page 776-777, Image 776-777 (1880) available at The Making of Modern Law: Primary Sources.

Carrying Concealed Weapons, § 2986. It shall not be lawful for any person to sell to any minor or person intoxicated knowing him to a a minor or in a state of intoxication, any weapons of the kind or description in the foregoing section described, or any pistol cartridge and on conviction he shall be punished by a fine not exceeding two hundred dollars, and if the fine and costs are not paid, be condemned to hard labor under the direction of the board of supervisors or of the court not exceeding six months. § 2987. Any father who shall knowingly suffer or permit any minor son under the age of sixteen years to carry concealed, in whole or in part, any person of the kind or description in the forgoing section described, shall be deemed guilty of a misdemeanor, and on conviction, shall be fined not less than twenty dollars, nor more than two hundred dollars, and if the fine and costs are not paid, shall be condemned to hard labor as provided in the proceeding section. § 2988. Any student of any university, college, or school, who shall carry concealed, in whole or in part, any weapon of the kind or description in the foregoing section described, or any teacher, instructor or professor who shall knowingly, suffer or permit any such weapon to be carried by any student or pupil, shall be deemed guilty of a misdemeanor and on conviction be fined not exceeding three hundred dollars, and if the fine and costs are not paid, be condemned to hard labor as above provided.




1878 Miss. Laws 176, An Act To Prevent The Carrying Of Concealed Weapons And For Other Purposes, ch. 46, § 4.

[A]ny student of any university, college or school, who shall carry concealed, in whole or in part, any weapon of the kind or description in the first section of this Act described, or any teacher, instructor, or professor who shall, knowingly, suffer or permit any such weapon to be carried by any student or pupil, shall be deemed guilty of a misdemeanor, and, on conviction, be fined not exceeding three hundred dollars, and if the fine and costs are not paid, condemned to hard labor under the direction of the board of supervisors or of the court.




1878 Miss. Laws 175-76, An Act To Prevent The Carrying Of Concealed Weapons And For Other Purposes, ch. 46, §§ 2-3.

§ 2. It shall not be lawful for any person to sell to any minor or person intoxicated, knowing him to be a minor or in a state of intoxication, any weapon of the kind or description in the first section of this Act described [pistols, various knives etc.], or any pistol cartridge, and on conviction shall be punished by a fine not exceeding two hundred dollars, and if the fine and costs are not paid, be condemned to hard labor under the direction of the board of supervisors or of the court, not exceeding six months. § 3. Any father, who shall knowingly suffer or permit any minor son under the age of sixteen years to carry concealed, in whole or in part, any weapon of the kind or description in the first section of this act described [pistols, knives, etc.], shall be deemed guilty of a misdemeanor, and on conviction, shall be fined not less than twenty dollars, nor more than two hundred dollars, and if the fine and costs are not paid, shall be condemned to hard labor under the direction of the board of supervisors or of the court.




1878 Miss. Laws 175, An Act To Prevent The Carrying Of Concealed Weapons And For Other Purposes, ch. 46, § 1.

That any person not being threatened with, or having good and sufficient reason to apprehend an attack, or traveling (not being a tramp) or setting out on a long journey, or peace officers, or deputies in discharge of their duties, who carries concealed, in whole or in part, any bowie knife, pistol, brass knuckles, slung shot or other deadly weapon of like kind or description, shall be deemed guilty of a misdemeanor, and on conviction, shall be punished for the first offense by a fine of not less than five dollars nor more than one hundred dollars, and in the event the fine and cost are not paid shall be required to work at hard labor under the direction of the board of supervisors or of the court, not exceeding two months, and for the second or any subsequent offence, shall, on conviction, be fined not less than fifty nor more than two hundred dollars, and if the fine and costs are not paid, be condemned to hard labor not exceeding six months under the direction of the board of supervisors, or of the court. That in any proceeding under this section, it shall not be necessary for the State to allege or prove any of the exceptions herein contained, but the burden of proving such exception shall be on the accused.




Amos Randall Johnston, The Revised Code of the Statute Laws of the State of Mississippi : As Adopted at January Session, A.D. 1871 Page 559-560, Image 559-560 (1871) available at The Making of Modern Law: Primary Sources.

Dueling and Challenging to Fight, § 2531. Every person, who shall challenge another to fight a duel, or who shall send, deliver, or cause to be delivered, any written or verbal messages, purporting or intended to be such challenge, or who shall accept any such challenge or message, or who shall knowingly carry or deliver any such message or challenge, or who shall be present at the time of fighting any duel with deadly weapons, either as second, aid or surgeon, or who shall advise or give assistance to such duel, shall, on conviction thereof, be fined in a sum not less than three hundred dollars, nor exceeding one thousand dollars, or be imprisoned, not less than six months, int eh county jail, or by both such fine and [i]mprisonment. . . . § 2534. If any person shall be guilty of fighting in any village, city, town or other public place, and shall in such fight use any rifle, shot-gun, sword, sword-cane, pistol, dirk, bowie-knife, dirk-knife, or any other deadly weapon, or if any person shall be second or aid in such fight, the person so offending shall be fined not less than three hundred dollars, or shall be imprisoned, not less than three months, or punished by both such fine and imprisonment; and if any person shall be killed in such fight, the person so killing the other, may be prosecuted and convicted as in other cases of murder.




Amos Randall Johnston, The Revised Code of the Statute Laws of the State of Mississippi : As Adopted at January Session, A.D. 1871 Page 586, Image 586 (1871) available at The Making of Modern Law: Primary Sources.

Sabbath, Violation of. § 2683. If any person shall be found hunting with a gun, or with dogs, on the Sabbath, or fishing in any way, he shall, on conviction thereof, be fined not less than five, nor more than twenty dollars.




1867 Miss. Laws 327-28, An Act To Tax Guns And Pistols in The County Of Washington, ch. 249, § 1.

[A] tax of not less than five dollars or more than fifteen dollars shall be levied and assessed annually by the board of Police of Washington county upon every gun and pistol which may be in the possession of any person in said county, which tax shall be payable at any time on demand, by the Sheriff, and if not so paid, it shall be the duty of the Sheriff to forthwith distrain and seize such gun or pistol, and sell the same for cash at the door of the Court House, after giving ten days notice by advertisement, posted in front of said Court House, and out of the proceeds of such sale, there shall be paid the amount of such tax and the cost of sale, and if any surplus remains, it shall be paid to the owner of such gun or pistol. The amount of the tax so assessed and collected, shall be paid to the county Treasurer, and shall constitute a part of the bridge fund of said county.




William Lewis Sharkey, The Revised Code of the Statute Laws of the State of Mississippi Page 610, Image 614 (1857) available at The Making of Modern Law: Primary Sources.

Sabbath, Violation of, Art. 229. If any person shall be found hunting with a gun, on the Sabbath, he shall, on convicted thereof, be fined not less than five, nor more than twenty dollars.




Anderson Hutchinson, Code of Mississippi: Being an Analytical Compilation of the Public and General Statutes of the Territory and State, with Tabular References to the Local and Private Acts, from 1798 to 1848: With the National and State Constitutions, Cessions of the Country by the Choctaw and Chickasaw Indians, and Acts of Congress for the Survey and Sale of the Lands, and Granting Donations Thereof to the State Page 182, Image 182 (1848) available at The Making of Modern Law: Primary Sources.

[Revenue, An Act to Amend and Reduce into one the several Acts in Relation to the Revunue of this State, and for other purposes – February 4, 1844, Rates of Taxation, § 1. . . .A tax of two dollars on each dueling or pocket pistol, except such as are kept for sale by merchants, artisans, or kept for use by military companies. . . ]




Volney Erskine Howard, The Statutes of the State of Mississippi of a Public and General Nature, with the Constitutions of the United States and of this State: And an Appendix Containing Acts of Congress Affecting Land Titles, Naturalization, &c, and a Manual for Clerks, Sheriffs and Justices of the Peace Page 676, Image 688 (1840) available at The Making of Modern Law: Primary Sources.

Crimes, Misdemeanors and Criminal Prosecution, § 55. If any person having or carrying any dirk, dirk knife, Bowie knife, sword, sword cane, or other deadly weapon, shall, in the presence of three or more persons, exhibit the same in a rude, angry and threatening manner, not in necessary self-defense, or shall in any manner unlawfully use the same in any fight or quarrel, the person or persons so offending, upon conviction thereof in the circuit or criminal court of the proper county, shall be fined in a sum not exceeding five hundred dollars, and be imprisoned not exceeding three months.




Laws of the State of Mississippi ; embracing all Acts of a Public Nature from January Session, 1824, to January Session 1838, Inclusive Page 736, Image 738 (Jackson, 1838) available at The Making of Modern Law: Primary Sources.

An Act to Prevent the Evil Practice of Dueling in this State, and for other Purposes, § 5. Be it further enacted, That if any person or persons shall be guilty of fighting in any corporate city or town, or any other town, or public place, in this state, and shall in such fight use any rifle, shot gun, sword, sword cane, pistol, dirk, bowie knife, dirk knife, or any other deadly weapon; or if any persons shall be second or aid in such fight, the persons so offending shall be fined not less than three hundred dollars, and shall be imprisoned not less than three months; and if any person shall be killed in such fight, the person so killing the other may also be prosecuted and convicted as in other cases of murder.