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13 Edw. I (1285) (Eng.) (Statutes for the City of London)

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"It is enjoined that none be so hardy to be found going or wandering about the Streets of the City, after Curfew tolled at St. Martins le Grand, with Sword or Buckler, or other Arms for doing Mischief, or whereof evil suspicion might arise; nor any in ...

“It is enjoined that none be so hardy to be found going or wandering about the Streets of the City, after Curfew tolled at St. Martins le Grand, with Sword or Buckler, or other Arms for doing Mischief, or whereof evil suspicion might arise; nor any in any other Manner, unless he be a great Man or other lawful Person of good repute, or their certain Messenger, having their Warrants to go from one to another, with Lanthern in hand.”

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2 Edw. 3, 320, ch. 3 (1328)

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Item, it is enacted, That no Man great nor small, of what Condition soever he be, except the King's Servants in his presence, and his Ministers in executing of the King's Precepts, of their Office, and such as be in their Company assisting them, and al...

Item, it is enacted, That no Man great nor small, of what Condition soever he be, except the King’s Servants in his presence, and his Ministers in executing of the King’s Precepts, of their Office, and such as be in their Company assisting them, and also [upon a Cry made for Arms to keep the Peace, and the same in such places where such Acts happen,] be so hardy to come before the King’s Ministers doing their office, with force and arms, nor bring no force in affray of the peace, nor to go nor ride armed by night nor by day, in Fairs, Markets, nor in the presence of the Justices or other Ministers, nor in no part elsewhere,upon pain to forfeit their Armour to the King, and their bodies to Prison at the King’s pleasure. And that the King’s Justices in their presence, Sheriffs, and other Ministers in thir Bailiwicks, Lords of Franchises, and their Bailiffs in the same, and Mayors and Bailiffs in the same, and Mayors and Bailiffs of Cities and Borough-Holders, Constables, and Wardens of the Peace within their Wards, shall have Power to execute this Act. And that the Justices assigned, at thir coming down into the Country, shall have Power to enquire how such officers and Lords have exercised thir offices in this Case, and to punish them whom they find that have not done that which pertained to their office.

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Statutory Crime of Affray, 25 Edw. 3, stat. 5, c. 2, § 13 (1350)

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and if percase any man of this realm ride armed [covertly] or secretly with Men of arms against any other to flay him, or rob him, or take him, or retain him till he hath made Fine or Ransom for to have his Deliverance, it is not the mind of the King n...

and if percase any man of this realm ride armed [covertly] or secretly with Men of arms against any other to flay him, or rob him, or take him, or retain him till he hath made Fine or Ransom for to have his Deliverance, it is not the mind of the King nor his Council, that in such Case it shall be judged Treason, but shall be judged Felony or Trespass, according to the laws of the land of old Time used, and according to the laws of the land of old time, used and according to the case requireth.

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20 Ric. 2, 93, ch. 1 (1396)

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First, whereas in a Statute made the Seventh Year of the Reign of the King that now is, it is ordained and assented, That no Man shall ride armed within the Realm, against the form of the Statute of Northampton thereupon made, nor with Launcegays withi...

First, whereas in a Statute made the Seventh Year of the Reign of the King that now is, it is ordained and assented, That no Man shall ride armed within the Realm, against the form of the Statute of Northampton thereupon made, nor with Launcegays within the same Realm, and that the said Launcegays shall by utterly put out within the said Realm, as a Thing prohibited by the King, upon Pain of Forfeiture of the same Launcegays, Armours, or any other Harness, in the Hands and Possession of them that bear them, form henceforth within the same Realm against the same Statutes and Ordinances without the King’s special License. Our Lord the King, considering the great clamour made to him in this present Parliament, because that the said Statute is not holden, hath ordained and established in the said Parliament, That the said Statutes shall be fully holden and kept, and duly executed; and that the said Launcegayes shall be clear put out upon the Pain contained in the said Statute of Northampton, and also to make Fine and Ransom to the King. And moreover, that no Lord, Knight nor other, little nor great, shall go nor ride by Night nor by Day armed, nor bear [Sallet] nor Skull of Iron, nor [of] other Armour, upon the pain aforesaid; save and except the King’s Officers and Ministers in doing their Office. And Moreover, the King will and hath ordained, that the statute made the First Year of his Reign, of Liveries of Hats, shall be holden and kept upon the pain contined in the same Statute, and upon Pain to be imprisoned, and make Fine and Ransom of the King.

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26 Hen. 8, c. 6, § 3 (1534)

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And also be it enacted by authority aforesaid, that no person or persons dwelling or residing within Wales or the Lordship marches of the same, of what estate degree or condition so ever he or they be of, coming, resorting or repairing unto any Session...

And also be it enacted by authority aforesaid, that no person or persons dwelling or residing within Wales or the Lordship marches of the same, of what estate degree or condition so ever he or they be of, coming, resorting or repairing unto any Sessions or Court to be holden within Wales or any Lordship marches of the same, shall bring or bear or cause to be brought or borne, to the same sessions or court or to any place within the distance of two miles from the same Sessions or Court, nor to any town, church, fair, market, or other congregation, except it be upon a hue or outcry made of any felony robbery done or perpetrated, nor in the highways in affray of the King’s peace or the King’s liege people, any bill, longbow, crossbow, handgun, sword, staff, dagger, halberd, morespike, spear, or any other manner of weapon, privy coat of armor defense; upon pain of forfeiture of the same weapon, privy coat or armor, and to suffer imprisonment and make fine and ransom to the King’s Highness by the discretion of the King’s Commissioners of his Marches for the time being; except it be by the command, license or assent of the said Justices, Steward or other Officer of the Commissioners or counsel of the Marches for the time being.

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33 Hen. 8, c. 6, § 1, An Act Concernin Crossbows and Handguns (1541).

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Where in the Parliament holden at Westminster the fifteenth day of January in the twenty-fifth year of the King’s most gracious reign, and there continued and kept until the thirtieth day of March then next ensuing, among diverse and sundry whole...

Where in the Parliament holden at Westminster the fifteenth day of January in the twenty-fifth year of the King’s most gracious reign, and there continued and kept until the thirtieth day of March then next ensuing, among diverse and sundry wholesome and laudable acts, statutes, and ordinances one statute and ordinance was made and ordained for the avoiding and eschewing of shooting in crossbows and handguns; since the making of which act diverse malicious and evil disposed persons not only presume willfully and obstinately the violation and breach of the said Act, but also of their malicious and evil disposed minds and purposes have willfully and shamefully committed perpetrated and done diverse detestable and shameful murders, robberies, felonies, riot and rout with crossbows little short handguns and little hagbut, to the great peril and continual fear and danger of the Kings most loving subjects, and also diverse keepers of forests, chases and parks as well of our aid Sovereign Lord as other his Nobles and Commons and diverse Gentlemen, Yeomen and serving men now of late have laid apart the good and laudable exercise of the long bow, which always heretofore hath been the surest safeguard and continual defense of this Realm of England, and an inestimable dread and terror to the enemies of the same, and now of late the said evil disposed persons have used and yet do daily use to ride and go in the King’s highways and elsewhere having with them crossbows and little handguns, ready furnished with Quarrel (gunpowder, fire and touche to the great peril and fear of the King’s most loving subjects : For reformation whereof be it enacted, ordained and established by the King our Sovereign Lord the Lords spiritual and temporal and the Commons in the Present Parliament assembled and by the authority of the same, in manner and form following that is to say; that no person or persons of what estate or degree he or they be, except he or they in their own right or in the right of his or their wife to his or their own uses or any other to the use of such person or persons, have lands, tenements, fees, annuities or office to the yearly value of one hundred pounds, from or after the last day of June next coming shall shoot any crossbow, handgun, hagbutt or demy hake, or use or keep in his or their houses or elsewhere any Crossbow, handgun, hagbutt or demy hake, otherwise or in any manner then is hereafter in the present Act declared, upon pain to forfeit for every time that he or they so offending contrary to this act Ten Pounds. And further be it enacted by authority aforesaid that no person or persons, of what estate or degree soever he or they be, from or after the said last day of Une shall shoot in, carry, keep, use, or have in his house or elsewhere any handgun other than such as shall be in stock and gun of the length of one whole yard, or any hagbutt or demy hake being not of the length of three quarters of a yard, ten pounds sterling and that it shall be lawful to every person and persons who have lands, tenements, fees, annuities or office to the yearly value of one hundred pounds as is aforesaid, to seize and teake every such crossbow and also every handgun being in stock and gun shorter in length than one whole yard and every hagbut and demyhake being shorter in length than three quarters of a yard, or any of them; from the keeping or possession of every such offender contrary to the form of this act, and the same crossbow or crossbows to keep and retain for his or their own use and also the same handguns, hagbut and demy hake so seized and taken within twenty days next after the same seizure of taking to break and destroy upon pain of fourteen shillings for every gun so seized and not broken and destroyed, and th same so broked and destroyed to keep and retain to his own or their own use. And be it further enacted by authority aforesaid, that no person or persons, other than such as have land, tenement, fees annuities or office, to the yearly value of one hundred pounds as aforesaid, from or after the said last day of June shall carry or have, in his or their Journey, going or riding in the King’s highway or elsewhere, any crossbow bent or gun charged or furnished with powder, fire or touche for the same, except it be in time and service of war, upon pain to forfeit for every such offense ten pounds; the present act or any thing therein contained to the contrary notwithstanding. And be it further enacted by authority aforesaid, that no person or persons form the last day of June shall in anyways shoot in or with any handgun demyhake or hagbutt at any thing at large, within any city, borough, or market town or within one quarter of a mile of any city, borough or market town, except it be at a butt or bank of earth in place convenient, or for the defense of his person or house, upon pain to forfeit for every such shot ten pounds; the present act or anything therein contained to the contrary notwithstanding.

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The Grants, Concessions, And Original Constitutions Of The Province Of New Jersey Page 289-290; Image 293-294 (1881) available at The Making Of Modern Law: Primary Sources.

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An Act Against Wearing Swords, Etc. Whereas there hath been great complaint by the inhabitants of this Province, that several persons wearing swords, daggers, pistols, dirks, stilettoes, skeines, or any other unusual or unlawful weapons, by reason of w...

An Act Against Wearing Swords, Etc. Whereas there hath been great complaint by the inhabitants of this Province, that several persons wearing swords, daggers, pistols, dirks, stilettoes, skeines, or any other unusual or unlawful weapons, by reason of which several persons in this Province, receive great abuses, and put in great fear and quarrels, and challenges made, to the great abuse of the inhabitants of this Province. . . And be it further enacted by the authority aforesaid, that no person or persons after publication hereof, shall presume privately to wear any pocket pistol, skeines, stilettoes, daggers or dirks, or other unusual or unlawful weapons within this Province, upon penalty for the first offence five pounds, and to be committed by any justice of the peace, his warrant before whom proof thereof shall be made, who is hereby authorized to enquire of and proceed in the same, and keep in custody till he hath paid the said five pounds, one half to the public treasury for the use of this Province, and the other half to the informer: And if such person shall again offend against this law, he shall be in like manner committed upon proof thereof before any justice of the peace to the common jail, there to remain till the next sessions, and upon conviction thereof by verdict of twelve men, shall receive judgment to be in prison six month, and pay ten pounds for the use aforesaid. And be it further enacted by the authority aforesaid, that no planter shall ride or go armed with sword, pistol or dagger, upon the penalty of five pounds, to be levied as aforesaid, excepting all officers, civil and military, and soldiers while in actual service, as also all strangers, travelling upon their lawful occasions through this Province, behaving themselves peaceably.

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1694 Mass. Laws 12, no. 6, An Act for the Punishing of Criminal Offenders.

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Further it is Enacted by the authority aforesaid, That every Justice of the Peace in the County where the Offence is committed , may cause to be staid and arrested all Affrayers, Rioters, Disturbers, or Breakers of the Peace, and such as shall ride or ...

Further it is Enacted by the authority aforesaid, That every Justice of the Peace in the County where the Offence is committed , may cause to be staid and arrested all Affrayers, Rioters, Disturbers, or Breakers of the Peace, and such as shall ride or go armed Offensively before any of their Majesties Justices, or other Their Officers or Ministers doing their Office or elsewhere.

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9 Geo. 1, c. 22 (1723), An act for the more effectual punishing wicked and evil-disposed persons going armed in disguise, and doing injuries and violences to the persons and properties of his Majesty’s subjects, and for the more speedy bringing the offenders to justice.

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I. WHEREAS several ill-designing and disorderly persons have of late associated themselves under the name of Blacks, and entered into confederacies to support and assist one another in stealing and destroying of deer, robbing of warrens and fish-ponds,...

I. WHEREAS several ill-designing and disorderly persons have of late associated themselves under the name of Blacks, and entered into confederacies to support and assist one another in stealing and destroying of deer, robbing of warrens and fish-ponds, cutting down plantations of trees, and other illegal practices, and have, in great numbers, armed with swords, fire-arms, and other offensive weapons, several of them with their faces blacked, or in disguised habits, unlawfully hunted in forests belonging to his Majesty, and in the parks of divers of his Majesty’s subjects, and destroyed, killed and carried away the deer, robbed warrens, rivers and fish-ponds, and cut down plantations of trees; and have likewise solicited several of his Majesty’s subjects, with promises of money, or other rewards, to join with them, and have sent letters in fictitious names, to several persons, demanding venison and money, and threatning some great violence, if such their unlawful demands should be refused, or if they should be interupted in, or prosecuted for such their wicked practises, and have actually done great damage to several persons, who have either refused to comply with such demands, or have endeavoured to bring them to justice, to the great terror of his Majesty’s peaceable subjects: For the preventing which wicked and unlawful practices, be it enacted by the King’s most excellent Majesty, by and with the advice and consent of the lords spiritual and temporal and commons, in parliament assembled, and by the authority of the same. That if any person or persons, from and after the first day of June in the year of our Lord one thousand seven hundred and twenty-three, being armed with swords, fire-arms, or other offensive weapons, and having his or their faces blacked, or being otherwise disguised, shall appear in any forest, chase, park, paddock, or grounds inclosed with any wall, pale, or other fence, wherein any deer have been or shall be usually kept, or in any warren or place where hares or conies have been or shall be usually kept, or in any high road, open heath, common or down, or shall unlawfully and wilfully hunt, wound, kill, destroy, or steal any red or fallow deer, or unlawfully rob any warren or place where conies or hares are usually kept, or shall unlawfully steal or take away any fish out of any river or pond; or if any person or persons, from and after the said first day of June shall unlawfully and wilfully hunt, wound, kill, destroy or steal any red or fallow deer, fed or kept in any places in any of his Majesty’s forests or chases, which are or shall be inclosed with pales, rails, or other fences, or in any park, paddock, or grounds inclosed, where deer have been or shall be usually kept; or shall unlawfully and maliciously break down the head or mound of any fish-pond, whereby the fish shall be lost or destroyed; or shall unlawfully and maliciously kill, maim or wound any cattle, or cut down or otherwise destroy any trees planted in any avenue, or growing in any garden, orchard or plantation, for ornament, shelter or profit; or shall set fire to any house, barn or out-house, or to any hovel, cock, mow, or stack of corn, straw, hay or wood; or shall wilfully and maliciously shoot at any person in any dwelling-house, or other place; or shall knowingly send any letter, without any name, subscribed thereto, or signed with a fictitious name, demanding money, venison, or other valuable thing; or shall forcibly rescue any person being lawfully in custody of any officer or other person, for any of the offences before mentioned; or if any person or persons shall, by gift or promise of money, or other reward, procure any of his Majesty’s subjects to join him or them in any such unlawful act; every person so offending, being thereof lawfully convicted, shall be adjudged guilty of felony, and shall suffer death as in cases of felony, without benefit of clergy.

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1749-51 Mass. Acts 339, An Act For Preventing And Suppressing Of Riots, Routs And Unlawful Assemblies, chap. 12, § 1

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If any persons to the number of twelve or more, being armed with clubs or other weapons. . . shall be unlawfully, riotously, or tumultuously assembled . . . (Read riot act, if don’t disperse) . . . It shall be lawful for every officer . . . to se...

If any persons to the number of twelve or more, being armed with clubs or other weapons. . . shall be unlawfully, riotously, or tumultuously assembled . . . (Read riot act, if don’t disperse) . . . It shall be lawful for every officer . . . to seize such persons, and carry them before a justice of the peace; and if such persons shall be killed or hurt by reason of their resisting . . . officers and their assistants shall be indemnified and held guiltless.

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Laws of the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania, from the Fourteenth Day of October, One Thousand Seven Hundred, to the Twentieth Day of March, One Thousand Eight Hundred and Ten Page 229, Image 288 (Vol. 1, 1810) available at The Making of Modern Law: Primary Sources.

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An Act to Prevent the hunting of deer, and other wild beasts, beyond the limits of the lands purchased of the Indians by the Proprietaries of this Province, and Against Killing Deer out of Season (1760), § VI. And whereas diverse abuses, damages a...

An Act to Prevent the hunting of deer, and other wild beasts, beyond the limits of the lands purchased of the Indians by the Proprietaries of this Province, and Against Killing Deer out of Season (1760), § VI. And whereas diverse abuses, damages and inconveniences, have arisen by persons carrying , guns and presuming to hunt on other peoples lands: For remedy whereof, for the future, Be it enacted, That if any person or persons shall presume, at any time after the publication of this act, to carry any gun, or hunt on any enclosed or improved lands of any of the inhabitants of this province, other than his own, unless he shall have license or permission from the owner of such lands, or shall presume to fire a gun on or near any of the king’s highways, and shall be thereof convicted, either upon view of any Justice of the Peace within this province, or by the oath or affirmation of any one or more witnesses, before any Justice of the Peace, he shall, for every such offence, forfeit the sum of forty shillings.

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Charles Nettleton, Laws of the State of New-Jersey Page 26, Image 53 (1821) available at The Making of Modern Law: Primary Sources.

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An Act for the Preservation of Deer, and other game, and to prevent trespassing with guns (1771), § 1. Be it Enacted by the Governor, Council and General Assembly of this colony of New Jersey, and it is hereby enacted by the authority of the same,...

An Act for the Preservation of Deer, and other game, and to prevent trespassing with guns (1771), § 1. Be it Enacted by the Governor, Council and General Assembly of this colony of New Jersey, and it is hereby enacted by the authority of the same, That if any person or persons shall presume, at any time after the publication hereof, to carry any gun on any lands not his own, and for which the owner pays taxes, or is in his lawful possession, unless he hath license or permission in writing from the owner or owners, or legal possessor, every such person so offending, and convicted thereof, either upon the view of any justice of the peace within this colony, or by the oath or affirmation of one or more witnesses, before any justice of the peace of either of the counties, cities, or towns corporate of this colony, in which the offender or offenders may be taken or reside, he or she, or they, shall for every offence, forfeit and pay to the owner of the soil, or his tenant in possession, the sum of forty shillings, with costs of sit; which forfeiture shall and may be sued for and recovered by the owner of the soil, or tenant in possession before any justice of the peace in this colony, for the use of such owner or tenant in possession. . . § 3. And be it further enacted by the authority aforesaid, That if the person or persons offending against this act be non-residents of this colony, he or they shall forfeit and pay for every such offence, five pounds, and shall forfeit his or their gun or guns to any person or persons, who shall inform and prosecute the same to effect, before any justice of the peace in any county of this colony, wherein the offender or offenders may be taken or apprehended.

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Charles Nettleton, Laws of the State of New-Jersey Page 25-26, Image 52-53 (1821) available at The Making of Modern Law: Primary Sources.

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An Act for the Preservation of Deer, and other game, and to prevent trespassing with guns (Dec. 21, 1771): Whereas the laws heretofore passed in this colony, for the preservation of deer and other game, and to prevent trespassing with guns, traps, and ...

An Act for the Preservation of Deer, and other game, and to prevent trespassing with guns (Dec. 21, 1771): Whereas the laws heretofore passed in this colony, for the preservation of deer and other game, and to prevent trespassing with guns, traps, and dogs, have, by experience, been found insufficient to answer the salutory purposes thereby intended, therefore — § 1. Be it Enacted by the Governor, Council and General Assembly of this colony of New Jersey, and it is hereby enacted by the authority of the same, That if any person or persons shall presume, at any time after the publication hereof, to carry any gun on any lands not his own, and for which the owner pays taxes, or is in his lawful possession, unless he hath license or permission in writing from the owner or owners, or legal possessor, every such person so offending, and convicted thereof, either upon the view of any justice of the peace within this colony, or by the oath or affirmation of one or more witnesses, before any justice of the peace of either of the counties, cities, or towns corporate of this colony, in which the offender or offenders may be taken or reside, he or she, or they, shall for every offence, forfeit and pay to the owner of the soil, or his tenant in possession, the sum of forty shillings, with costs of suit; which forfeiture shall and may be sued for and recovered by the owner of the soil, or tenant in possession before any justice of the peace in this colony, for the use of such owner or tenant in possession.

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1786 Va. Laws 33, ch. 21, An Act forbidding and punishing Affrays.

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Be it enacted by the General Assembly, that no man, great nor small, of what condition soever he be, except the Ministers of Justice in executing the precepts of the Courts of Justice, or in executing of their office, and such as be in their company as...

Be it enacted by the General Assembly, that no man, great nor small, of what condition soever he be, except the Ministers of Justice in executing the precepts of the Courts of Justice, or in executing of their office, and such as be in their company assisting them, be so hardy to come before the Justices of any Court, or other of their Ministers of Justice, doing their office, with force and arms, on pain, to forfeit their armour to the Commonwealth, and thir bodies to prison, at the pleasure of a Court; nor go nor ride armed by night nor by day, in fair or markets, or in other places, in terror of the Country, upon pain of being arrested and committed to prison by any Justice on his own view, or proof of others, there to abide for so long a time as a Jury, to be sworn for that purpose by the said Justice shall direct, and in like manner to forfeit his armour to the commonwealth; but no person shall be imprisoned for such offence by a longer space of time than one month.

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Francois Xavier Martin, A Collection of Statutes of the Parliament of England in Force in the State of North Carolina, 60-61 (Newbern 1792)

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Item, it is enacted, that no man great nor small, of what condition soever he be, except the King's servants in his presence, and his Ministers in executing of the King's precepts, of of their office, and such as be in their company assisting them, and...

Item, it is enacted, that no man great nor small, of what condition soever he be, except the King’s servants in his presence, and his Ministers in executing of the King’s precepts, of of their office, and such as be in their company assisting them, and also upon a cry made for arms to keep the peace, and the same in such places where such acts happen, be so hardy to come before the King’s justices, or other of the King’s Ministers doing their office with force and arms, nor bring no force in affray of peace, nor to go nor ride armed by night nor by day, in fairs, markets nor in the presence of the King’s Justices, or other ministers, nor it [sic, likely “in”] no part elsewhere, upon pain to forfeit their armour to the King, and their bodies to prison at the King’s pleasure. And that the King’s Justices in their presence, Sheriffs and other ministers in their bailiwicks, Lords of Franchises, and their bailiffs in the same, and Mayors and Bailiffs of cities and boroughs, within the same cities and boroughs, and boroughholders, constables and wardens of the peace within their wards shall have power to execute this etc. [in original] And that the Justices assigned, at thier coming down into the country , shall have power to enquire how such officers and lords have exercised their offices in this case, and to punish them whom they find that have not done that which pertain to their office.

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1795 Mass. Laws 436, ch. 2, An Act for Repealing an Act, made and passed in the year of our Lord, on eThousand six Hundred and ninty-two, entitled, “An Act for punishing Criminal Offenders,” and for reenacting certain provisions therein.

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And it is further enacted by the authority aforesaid, That every Justice of the Peace, within the county for which he may be commissioned, may cause to be staid and arrested, all affrayers, rioters, disturbers, or breakers of the peace, and such as sha...

And it is further enacted by the authority aforesaid, That every Justice of the Peace, within the county for which he may be commissioned, may cause to be staid and arrested, all affrayers, rioters, disturbers, or breakers of the peace, and such as shall ride or go armed offensively, to the fear or terror of the good citizens of this Commonwealth, or such others as may utter any menaces or threatening speeches, and upon view of such Justice, confession of the delinquent, or other legal conviction of any such offence, shall require of the offender to find sureties for his keeping the Peace, and being of the good behavior; and in want therof, to commit him to prison until he shall comply with such requisition: and may further punish the breach of the Peace in any person that shall assault or strike another, by fine to the Commonwealth, not exceeding twenty shillings, and require sureties as aforesaid, or bind the offender, to appear and answer for his offence, at the next Court of General Sessions of the Peace, as the nature or circumstances of the case may require.

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Judge Edward Scott, Laws of the State of Tennessee: Including Those of North Carolina Now in Force in this State: From the Year 1715 to the Year 1820, Inclusive Page 710, Image 714 (Vol. 1, 1821) The Making of Modern Law: Primary Sources.

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An Act for the Restraint of Idle and Disorderly Persons § 6. Be it enacted, That if any person or persons shall publicly ride or go armed to the terror of the people, or privately carry any dirk, large knife, pistol or any other dangerous weapon,...

An Act for the Restraint of Idle and Disorderly Persons § 6. Be it enacted, That if any person or persons shall publicly ride or go armed to the terror of the people, or privately carry any dirk, large knife, pistol or any other dangerous weapon, to the fear or terror of any person, it shall be the duty of any judge or justice, on his own view, or upon the information of any other person on oath, to bind such person or persons to their good behavior, and if he or they fail to find securities, commit him or them to jail, and if such person or persons shall continue so to offend, he or they shall not only forfeit their recognizance, but be liable to an indictment, and be punished as for a breach of the peace, or riot at common law

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1813 Ky. Acts 100, An Act to Prevent Persons in this Commonwealth from Wearing Concealed Arms, Except in Certain Cases, ch. 89, § 1.

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Be it enacted by the General Assembly of the Commonwealth of Kentucky, that any person in this Commonwealth, who shall hereafter wear a pocket pistol, dirk, large knife, or sword in a cane, concealed as a weapon, unless when travelling on a journey, sh...

Be it enacted by the General Assembly of the Commonwealth of Kentucky, that any person in this Commonwealth, who shall hereafter wear a pocket pistol, dirk, large knife, or sword in a cane, concealed as a weapon, unless when travelling on a journey, shall be fined . . .

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1813 La. Acts 172, An Act Against Carrying Concealed Weapons, and Going Armed in Public Places in an Unneccessary Manner, § 1.

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Be it enacted by the senate and house of representatives of the state of Louisiana, in general assembly convened, That from and after the passage of this act, any person who shall be found with any concealed weapon, such as a dirk, dagger, knife, pisto...

Be it enacted by the senate and house of representatives of the state of Louisiana, in general assembly convened, That from and after the passage of this act, any person who shall be found with any concealed weapon, such as a dirk, dagger, knife, pistol, or any other deadly weapon concealed in his bosom, coat, or in any other place about him that do not appear in full open view, any person so offending, shall on conviction thereof before any justice of the peace, be subject to pay a fine . . . .

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Lucius Q.C. Lamar, A Compilation of the Laws of the State of Georgia, Passed by the Legislature since the Year 1810 to the Year 1819, Inclusive. Comprising all the Laws Passed within those Periods, Arranged under Appropriate Heads, with Notes of Reference to those Laws, or Parts of Laws, which are Amended or Repealed to which are Added such Concurred and Approved Resolutions, as are Either of General, Local, or Private Moment. Concluding with a Copious Index to the Laws, a Separate one to the Resolutions Page 599, Image 605 (1821) available at The Making of Modern Law: Primary Sources.

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Offences Against the Public Peace, (1816) § 19. If any person shall be apprehended, having upon him or her any picklock, key, crow, jack, bit or other implement, with intent feloniously to break and enter into any dwelling-house, ware-house, store...

Offences Against the Public Peace, (1816) § 19. If any person shall be apprehended, having upon him or her any picklock, key, crow, jack, bit or other implement, with intent feloniously to break and enter into any dwelling-house, ware-house, store, shop, coach-house, stable, or out-house, or shall have upon him any pistol, hanger, cutlass, bludgeon, or other offensive weapon, with intent feloniously to assault any person, or shall be found in or upon any dwelling-house, ware-house, store, shop, coach-house, stable, or out-house, with intent to steal any goods or chattels; every such person shall be deemed a rogue and vagabond, and on conviction, shall be sentenced to undergo an imprisonment in the common jail of the county, or in the penitentiary, at hard labour, for such period of time as the jury shall recommend to the court.

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1819 Ind. Acts 39, An Act to Prohibit the Wearing of Concealed Weapons

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Be it enacted by the General Assembly of the State of Indiana, That any person wearing any dirk, pistol, sword in cane, or any other unlawful weapon, concealed, shall be deemed guilty of a misdemeanor, and on conviction thereof, by presentment or indic...

Be it enacted by the General Assembly of the State of Indiana, That any person wearing any dirk, pistol, sword in cane, or any other unlawful weapon, concealed, shall be deemed guilty of a misdemeanor, and on conviction thereof, by presentment or indictment, shall be fined in any sum not exceeding one hundred dollars, for the use of county seminaries: Provided however, that this act shall not be so construed as to affect travellers.

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Robert Looney Caruthers, A Compilation of the Statutes of Tennessee, of a General and Permanent Nature, from the Commencement of the Government to the Present time: With References to Judicial Decisions, in Notes, to Which is Appended a New Collection of Forms Page 100, Image 105 (1836) available at The Making of Modern Law: Primary Sources.

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An Act of 1821, § 1. Every person so degrading himself by carrying a dirk, sword cane, Spanish stiletto, belt or pocket pistols, either public or private, shall pay a fine of five dollars for every such offence, which may be recovered by warrant b...

An Act of 1821, § 1. Every person so degrading himself by carrying a dirk, sword cane, Spanish stiletto, belt or pocket pistols, either public or private, shall pay a fine of five dollars for every such offence, which may be recovered by warrant before any justice of the peace, in the name of the county for its use, in which the offence may have been committed; and it shall be the duty of a justice to issue a warrant on the application, on oath, of any person applying; and it shall be the duty of every judge, justice of the peace, sheriff, coroner, and constable within this state, to see that this act shall have its full effect: Provided, that nothing herein contained shall affect any person that may be on a journey to any place out of his county or state.

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1821 Me. Laws 285, ch. 76, § 1.

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Be it enacted by the Senate, and House of Representatives, in Legislature assembled, That it shall be within the power, and be the duty of every Justice of the Peace within this county, to punish by fine not exceeding five dollars, all assaults and bat...

Be it enacted by the Senate, and House of Representatives, in Legislature assembled, That it shall be within the power, and be the duty of every Justice of the Peace within this county, to punish by fine not exceeding five dollars, all assaults and batteries that are not of a high and aggravated nature, and to examine into all homicides, murders, treasons, and felonies done and committed in this county, and commit to prison all persons guilty, or suspected to be guilty of manslaughter, murder, treason or other capital offence; and to cause to be staid and arrested, all affrayers, rioters, disturbers or breakers of the peace, and such as shall ride or go armed offensively, to the fear or terror of the good citizens of this State, or such others as may utter any menaces or threatening speeches; and upon view of such Justice, confession of the delinquent or other legal conviction of any such offence, shall require of the offender to fund sureties to appear and answer for his offence, at the Supreme Judicial Court, or Circuit Court of Common Pleas, next to be held within or for the same county at the discretion of the Justice, and as the nature or circumstances of the case may require;

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1821 Tenn. Pub. Acts 15-16, An Act to Prevent the Wearing of Dangerous and Unlawful Weapons, ch. 13.

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[E]ach and every person so degrading himself, by carrying a dirk, sword cane, French knife, Spanish stiletto, belt or pocket pistols . . . shall pay a fine of five dollars for every such offence[.]

Robert Looney Caruthers, A Compilation of the Statutes of Tennessee, of a General and Permanent Nature, from the Commencement of the Government to the Present time: With References to Judicial Decisions, in Notes, to Which is Appended a New Collection of Forms Page 100-101; Image 105-106 (1836) available at The Making of Modern Law: Primary Sources.

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An Act of 1825, § 1. When any sheriff, coroner, or constable, shall know of his own knowledge, or upon the representation of any person, or if he or they, shall have good reason to suspect, any person of being armed with the intention of committin...

An Act of 1825, § 1. When any sheriff, coroner, or constable, shall know of his own knowledge, or upon the representation of any person, or if he or they, shall have good reason to suspect, any person of being armed with the intention of committing a riot or affray, or the wounding or killing any person, it shall be the duty of all such officers, immediately to arrest all such persons so suspected, and return them before some justice of the peace, whose duty it shall be, upon proof being made, that there was reasonable ground to suspect such person or persons for being armed, with intent to disturb or commit a breach of the peace, to bind such person or persons in a bond with two or more good and sufficient securities, in a sum of not less than two hundred and fifty dollars, and not exceeding two thousand dollars, conditioned for his or their good behavior and peaceable deportment for the term of twelve months thereafter. § 2. If any justice of the peace shall know of his knowledge, or have reasonable cause to suspect, any person or persons of being armed with intent to commit a breach of the peace, it shall be the duty of such justice of the peace, to cause such offender or offenders, to be arrested and immediately brought before him or some other justice for examination, and upon its being satisfactory made to appear, that such person or persons was armed or about to be armed with intent to commit a breach of the peace, such justice shall bind such offender or offenders in bond and security, as specified in the first section of this act. § 3. The bonds by this act required to be given, shall be made payable to the chairman of the county court in which the same shall be executed, and his successors in office, and shall be filed in the office of the clerk of said court; and it shall be the duty of the solicitor for the state, when he shall believe such bond be forfeited, to issue scire facias thereon against such offender and his securities, and the amount collected shall be by the sheriff paid to the county trustee for county purposes. § 4. Any justice of the peace, sheriff, coroner, or constable, when acting under the provisions of this act, shall have power and authority to summon as many persons as they may think proper, to assist in arresting and securing any such offender, and any person so summoned who shall fail or refuse to assist such officer, for the purposes aforesaid, shall forfeit and pay the sum of ten dollars and cost, to be recovered before any justice of the peace, for the use of the county; and it shall be the duty of such officer, when he may have summoned any person to assist as aforesaid, and such person shall fail or refuse to obey such summons, to prosecute such defaulter before some justice of the peace, for the above penalty, and give evidence, of such summons and default. § 5. When any person shall be brought before any justice of the peace as required by the first and second sections of this act, and shall fail or refuse to give the security required, it shall be the duty of such justice, to commit such offender to the nearest sufficient jail for safe keeping, until such security is given, or he shall be discharged by due course of law.

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1831 Ind. Acts 192, § 58.

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That every person, not being a traveller, who shall wear or carry a dirk, pistol, sword in a cane, or other dangerous weapon concealed, shall upon conviction thereof, be fined in any sum not exceeding one hundred dollars.

John P. Duval, Compilation of the Public Acts of the Legislative Council of the Territory of Florida, Passed Prior to 1840 Page 423, Image 425 (1839) available at The Making of Modern Law: Primary Sources.

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An Act to Prevent any Person in this Territory from Carrying Arms Secretly. Be it Enacted by the Governor and Legislative Council of the Territory of Florida, That from and after the passage of this act, it shall not be lawful for any person in this Te...

An Act to Prevent any Person in this Territory from Carrying Arms Secretly. Be it Enacted by the Governor and Legislative Council of the Territory of Florida, That from and after the passage of this act, it shall not be lawful for any person in this Territory to carry arms of any kind whatsoever secretly, on or about their persons; and if any dirk, pistol, or other arm, or weapon, except a common pocket-knife, shall be seen, or known to be secreted upon the person of any one in this Territory, such person so offending shall, on conviction, be fined not exceeding five hundred dollars, and not less than fifty dollars, or imprisoned not more than six months, and not less than one month, at the discretion of the jury: Provided, however, that this law shall not be so construed as to prevent any person from carrying arms openly, outside of all their clothes; and it shall be the duty of judges of the superior courts in this Territory, to give the matter contained in this act in special charge to the grand juries in the several counties in this Territory, at every session of the courts.

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Theron Metcalf, The Revised Statutes of the Commonwealth of Massachusetts, Passed November 4, 1835; to Which are Subjoined, an Act in Amendment Thereof, and an Act Expressly to Repeal the Acts Which are Consolidated Therein, Both Passed in February 1836; and to Which are Prefixed, the Constitutions of the United States and of the Commonwealth of Massachusetts Page 750, Image 764 (1836) available at The Making of Modern Law: Primary Sources.

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Of Proceedings to Prevent the Commission of Crimes, § 16. If any person shall go armed with a dirk, dagger, sword, pistol, or other offensive and dangerous weapon, without reasonable cause to fear an assault or other injury, or violence to his per...

Of Proceedings to Prevent the Commission of Crimes, § 16. If any person shall go armed with a dirk, dagger, sword, pistol, or other offensive and dangerous weapon, without reasonable cause to fear an assault or other injury, or violence to his person, or to his family or property, he may, on complaint of any person having reasonable cause to fear an injury, or breach of the peace, be required to find sureties for keeping the peace, for a term not exceeding six months, with the right of appealing as before provided.

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1837 Ga. Acts 90, An Act to Guard and Protect the Citizens of this State, Against the Unwarrantable and too Prevalent use of Deadly Weapons, §§ 1–4.

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§ 1 . . . it shall not be lawful for any merchant, or vender of wares or merchandize in this State, or any other person or persons whatsoever, to sell, or offer to sell, or to keep, or to have about their person or elsewhere, any of the hereinafte...

§ 1 . . . it shall not be lawful for any merchant, or vender of wares or merchandize in this State, or any other person or persons whatsoever, to sell, or offer to sell, or to keep, or to have about their person or elsewhere, any of the hereinafter described weapons, to wit: Bowie, or any other kinds of knives, manufactured and sold for the purpose of wearing, or carrying the same as arms of offence or defense, pistols, dirks, sword canes, spears, &c., shall also be contemplated in this act, save such pistols as are known and used as horseman’s pistols, &c.
§ 2. And be it further enacted by the authority aforesaid, That any person or persons within the limits of this State, violating the provisions of this act, except as hereafter excepted, shall, for each and every such offence, be deemed guilty of a high misdemeanor, and upon trial and conviction thereof, shall be fined, in a sum not exceeding five hundred dollars for the first offence, nor less than one hundred dollars at the direction of the Court; and upon a second conviction, and every after conviction of a like offence, in a sum not to exceed one thousand dollars, nor less than five hundred dollars, at the discretion of the Court.
§ 3. And be it further enacted by the authority aforesaid, That it shall be the duty of all civil officers, to be vigilant in carrying the provisions of this act into full effect, as well also as Grand Jurors, to make presentments of each and every offence under this act, which shall come under their knowledge.
§4. And be it further enacted by the authority aforesaid, That all fines and forfeitures arising under this act, shall be paid into the county Treasury, to be appropriated to county purposes: Provided, nevertheless, that the provisions of this act shall not extend to Sheriffs, Deputy Sheriffs, Marshals, Constables, Overseers or Patrols, in actual discharge of their respective duties, but not otherwise: Provided, also, that no person or persons, shall be found guilty of violating the before recited act, who shall openly wear, externally, Bowie Knives, Dirks, Tooth Picks, Spears, and which shall be exposed plainly to view: And provided, nevertheless, that the provisions of this act shall not extend to prevent venders, or any other persons who now own and have for sale, any of the aforesaid weapons, before the first day of March next.

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Josiah Gould A Digest of the Statutes of Arkansas All Laws of a General and Permanent Character in Force the Close of the Session of the General Assebly of 380 381–82.

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Every person who shall wear any pistol, dirk, butcher or large knife, or a sword in a cane, concealed as a weapon, unless upon a journey, shall be adjudged guilty of a misdemeanor.

Acts of the General Assembly of Virginia, Passed at the Session of 1838, chap. 101, at 76

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It is against the law to habitually or generally keep or carry about his person any pistol, dirk, bowie knife, or any other weapon of the like kind . . . hidden or concealed from common observation.

1837-38 Tenn. Pub. Acts 200-01, An Act to Suppress the Sale and Use of Bowie Knives and Arkansas Tooth Picks in this State, ch 137, § 2.

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That if any person shall wear any Bowie knife, Arkansas tooth pick, or other knife or weapon that shall in form, shape or size resemble a Bowie knife or Arkansas toothpick under his clothes, or keep the same concealed about his person, such person shal...

That if any person shall wear any Bowie knife, Arkansas tooth pick, or other knife or weapon that shall in form, shape or size resemble a Bowie knife or Arkansas toothpick under his clothes, or keep the same concealed about his person, such person shall be guilty of a misdemeanor, and upon conviction thereof shall be fined in a sum not less than two hundred dollars, nor more than five hundred dollars, and shall be imprisoned in the county jail not less than three months and not more than six months.

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Acts of the General Assembly of Virginia, Passed at the Session of 1838, chap. 101, at 76, § 1

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Be it enacted by the general assembly, That if any person shall hereafter habitually or generally keep or carry about his person any pistol, dirk, bowie knife, or any other weapon of the like kind, from this use of which the death of any person might p...

Be it enacted by the general assembly, That if any person shall hereafter habitually or generally keep or carry about his person any pistol, dirk, bowie knife, or any other weapon of the like kind, from this use of which the death of any person might probabily ensue, and the same be hidden or concealed from common observation, and he be thereof convicted, he shall for every such offense forfeit and pay the sum of not less than fifty dollars nor more than five hundred dollars, or be imprisoned in the common jail for a term not less than one month nor more than six months, and in each instance at the discretion of the jury; and a moiety of the penalty recovered in any prosecution under this act, shall be given to any person who may voluntarily institute the same.

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Edward Vernon Whiton, Statutes of the Territory of Wisconsin, Passed by the Legislative Assembly Thereof, at a Session Commencing in November 1838, and at an Adjourned Session Commencing in January, 1839, Page 381, Image 381 (1839) available at The Making of Modern Law: Primary Sources.

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An Act to Prevent the Commission of Crimes, § 16. If any person shall go armed with a dirk, dagger, sword, pistol or pistols, or other offensive and dangerous weapon, without reasonable cause to fear an assault or other injury, or violence to his ...

An Act to Prevent the Commission of Crimes, § 16. If any person shall go armed with a dirk, dagger, sword, pistol or pistols, or other offensive and dangerous weapon, without reasonable cause to fear an assault or other injury, or violence to his person, or to his family, or property, he may, on complaint of any other person having reasonable cause to fear an injury or breach of the peace, be required to find sureties for keeping the peace for a term not exceeding six months, with the right of appealing as before provided.

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Revised Statutes of the State of Arkansas, Adopted at the October Session of the General Assembly of Said State, A.D. 1837, in the Year of Our Independence the Sixty second, and of the State of Second Year Page 280, Image 295 (1838) available at The Making of Modern Law: Primary Sources.

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Every person who shall wear any pistol, dirk, butcher or large knife, or a sword in a cane, concealed as a weapon, unless upon a journey, shall be adjudged guilty of a misdemeanor, and upon conviction thereof, in the county in which the said offence sh...

Every person who shall wear any pistol, dirk, butcher or large knife, or a sword in a cane, concealed as a weapon, unless upon a journey, shall be adjudged guilty of a misdemeanor, and upon conviction thereof, in the county in which the said offence shall have been committed, shall be fined in any sum not less than twentyfive dollars, nor more than one hundred dollars, one half to be paid into the county treasury, the other half to the informer, and shall also be imprisoned not less than one, nor more than six months.

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1839 Ala. Acts 67, An Act to Suppress the Evil Practice of Carrying Weapons Secretly, § 1

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That if any person shall carry concealed about his person any species of fire arms, or any bowie knife, Arkansas tooth-pick, or any other knife of the like kind, dirk, or any other deadly weapon, the person so offending shall, on conviction thereof, be...

That if any person shall carry concealed about his person any species of fire arms, or any bowie knife, Arkansas tooth-pick, or any other knife of the like kind, dirk, or any other deadly weapon, the person so offending shall, on conviction thereof, before any court having competent jurisdiction, pay a fine not less than fifty, nor more than five hundred dollars, to be assessed by the jury trying the case; and be imprisoned for a term not exceeding three months, at the discretion of the Judge of said court.

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The Revised Statutes of the State of Maine, Passed October 22, 1840; To Which are Prefixed the Constitutions of the United States and of the State of Maine, and to Which Are Subjoined the Other Public Laws of 1840 and 1841, with an Appendix Page 709, Image 725 (1847) available at The Making of Modern Law: Primary Sources.

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Justices of the Peace, § 16. Any person, going armed with any dirk, dagger, sword, pistol, or other offensive and dangerous weapon, without a reasonable cause to fear an assault on himself, or any of his family or property, may, on the complaint o...

Justices of the Peace, § 16. Any person, going armed with any dirk, dagger, sword, pistol, or other offensive and dangerous weapon, without a reasonable cause to fear an assault on himself, or any of his family or property, may, on the complaint of any person having cause to fear an injury or breach of the peace, be required to find sureties for keeping the peace for a term, not exceeding one year, with the right of appeal as before provided.

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1841 Ala. Acts 148–49, Of Miscellaneous Offences, ch. 7, § 4.

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Everyone who shall hereafter carry concealed about his person, a bowie knife, or knife or instrument of the like kind or description, by whatever name called, dirk or any other deadly weapon, pistol or any species of firearms, or air gun, unless such p...

Everyone who shall hereafter carry concealed about his person, a bowie knife, or knife or instrument of the like kind or description, by whatever name called, dirk or any other deadly weapon, pistol or any species of firearms, or air gun, unless such person shall be threatened with, or have good cause to apprehend an attack, or be travelling, or setting out on a journey, shall on conviction, be fined not less than fifty nor more than three hundred dollars: It shall devolve on the person setting up the excuse here allowed for carrying concealed weapons, to make it out by proof, to the satisfaction of the jury; but no excuse shall be sufficient to authorize the carrying of an air gun, bowie knife, or knife of the like kind or description.

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1841 Me. Laws 709, ch. 169, § 16.

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If any person shall go armed with a dirk, dagger, sword, pistol, or other offensive and dangerous weapon, without reasonable cause to fear an assault or other injury or violence to his person, or to his family or property, he may, on complaint of any p...

If any person shall go armed with a dirk, dagger, sword, pistol, or other offensive and dangerous weapon, without reasonable cause to fear an assault or other injury or violence to his person, or to his family or property, he may, on complaint of any person having resonable cause to fear an injury or breach of the peace, be required to find sureties for keeping the peace, for a term not exceeding six months, with the right of appealing as before provided.

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John J. Ormond, The Code of Alabama Page 588-89, Image 608-09 (1852) available at The Making of Modern Law: Primary Sources

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Indictable Offences, § 3273. Any one who carries concealed about his person a bowie knife, or knife or instrument of the like kind or description by whatever name called, or air gun, must, on conviction, be fined not less than fifty or more than t...

Indictable Offences, § 3273. Any one who carries concealed about his person a bowie knife, or knife or instrument of the like kind or description by whatever name called, or air gun, must, on conviction, be fined not less than fifty or more than three hundred dollars. § 3274. Any one who carries concealed about his person a pistol, or any other description of fire arms, not being threatened with, or having good reason to apprehend an attack, or travelling, or setting out on a journey, must, on conviction, be fined not less than fifty nor more than three hundred dollars. § 3275. In an indictment under the preceding section, it is sufficient to charge that the defendant carried concealed about his person a pistol or other description of fire arms; and the excuse must be made out by the defendant, to the satisfaction of the jury.

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Henry A. Bullard & Thomas Curry, 1 A New Digest of the Statute Laws of the State of Louisiana, from the Change of Government to the Year 1841 at 252 (E. Johns & Co., New Orleans, 1842).

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. . . [A]ny person who shall be found with any concealed weapon, such as a dirk, dagger, knife, pistol, or any other deadly weapon concealed in his bosom, coat, or in any other place about him, that do not appear in full open view, any person so offend...

. . . [A]ny person who shall be found with any concealed weapon, such as a dirk, dagger, knife, pistol, or any other deadly weapon concealed in his bosom, coat, or in any other place about him, that do not appear in full open view, any person so offending, shall, on conviction thereof, before an justice of the peace, be subject to pay a fine not to exceed fifty dollars, nor less than twenty dollars . . . .

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Sanford Moon Green, The Revised Statutes of the State of Michigan: Passed and Approved May 18, 1846 Page 692, Image 708 (1846) available at The Making of Modern Law: Primary Sources.

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Arrest &c. of Offenders, § 16. If any person shall go armed with a dirk, dagger, sword, pistol or other offensive and dangerous weapon, without reasonable cause to fear an assault or other injury, or violence to his person, or to his family or...

Arrest &c. of Offenders, § 16. If any person shall go armed with a dirk, dagger, sword, pistol or other offensive and dangerous weapon, without reasonable cause to fear an assault or other injury, or violence to his person, or to his family or property, he may, on complaint of any person having reasonable cause to fear an injury or breach of the peace, be required to find sureties for keeping the peace, for a term not exceeding six months, with the right of appealing as before provided.

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1847 Va. Laws 127, c. 14, § 16.

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If any person shall go armed with any offensive or dangerous weapon without reasonable cause to fear an assault or other injury, or violence to his person, or to his family or property, he may be required to find sureties for keeping the peace for a te...

If any person shall go armed with any offensive or dangerous weapon without reasonable cause to fear an assault or other injury, or violence to his person, or to his family or property, he may be required to find sureties for keeping the peace for a term not exceeding twelve months, with the right of appealing as before provided.

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Arthur Loomis Sanborn, Annotated Statutes of Wisconsin, Containing the General Laws in Force October 1, 1889, Also the Revisers’ Notes to the Revised Statutes of 1858 and 1878, Notes of Cases Construing and Applying the Constitution and Statutes, and the Rules of the County and Circuit Courts and of the Supreme Court Page 2379, Image 1001 (Vol. 2, 1889) available at The Making of Modern Law: Primary Sources.

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Armed Person to Give Security, § 4834. If any person shall go armed with a dirk, dagger, sword, pistol or pistols, or other offensive and dangerous weapon, without reasonable cause to fear an assault or other injury or violence to his person, or t...

Armed Person to Give Security, § 4834. If any person shall go armed with a dirk, dagger, sword, pistol or pistols, or other offensive and dangerous weapon, without reasonable cause to fear an assault or other injury or violence to his person, or to his family or property, he may, on complaint of any other person having reasonable cause to fear an injury or breach of the peace, be required to find sureties for keeping the peace for a term not exceeding six months, with the right of appealing as before provided.

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1849 Cal. Stat. 245, An Act to Incorporate the City of San Francisco, § 127.

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. . . if any person shall have upon him any pistol, gun, knife, dirk, bludgeon, or other offensive weapon, with intent to assault any person, every such person, on conviction, shall be fined not more than one hundred dollars or imprisoned in the County...

. . . if any person shall have upon him any pistol, gun, knife, dirk, bludgeon, or other offensive weapon, with intent to assault any person, every such person, on conviction, shall be fined not more than one hundred dollars or imprisoned in the County Jail not more than three months.

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1850 Mass. Gen. Law, ch. 194, §1.

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Any person arrested upon the warrant of a magistrate, issued against him for any alleged offence against the laws of this Commonwealth, and any person committing any criminal offence aginst the laws of this Commonwealth, or any breach or disturbance of...

Any person arrested upon the warrant of a magistrate, issued against him for any alleged offence against the laws of this Commonwealth, and any person committing any criminal offence aginst the laws of this Commonwealth, or any breach or disturbance of the public peace, who may, at the time of the commission of such offence, or breach or disturbance of the public peace, be arrested by any sheriff, deputy sheriff, constable, or police officer, in this State, and who shall, at the time of such arrest, be armed with any dangerous weapon, of the kind usually called slung shot, shall be punished by a fine not exceeding fifty dollars, or imprisonment in the common jail or house of correction for a term not exceeding one year.

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1851 Pa. Laws 382, An Act Authorizing Francis Patrick Kenrick, Bishop of Philadelphia, to Convey Certain Real Estate in the Borough of York, and a Supplement to the Charter of Said Borough, § 4.

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That any person who shall willfully and maliciously carry any pistol, gun, dirk knife, slung shot, or deadly weapon in said borough of York, shall be deemed guilty of a felony, and being thereof convicted shall be sentenced to undergo an imprisonment a...

That any person who shall willfully and maliciously carry any pistol, gun, dirk knife, slung shot, or deadly weapon in said borough of York, shall be deemed guilty of a felony, and being thereof convicted shall be sentenced to undergo an imprisonment at hard labor for a term not less than 6 months nor more than one year and shall give security for future good behavior for such sum and for such time as the court before whom such conviction shall take place may fix; and any person or persons who shall otherwise offend against the provisions of this section shall be fined in a sum not exceeding one hundred dollars, for the use of the borough of York, or be imprisoned for a term not exceeding one year, or both at the discretion of the court, or may be held to bail for future good behavior.

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Morton Smith Wilkinson, The Revised Statutes of the Territory of Minnesota, Passed at the Second Session of the Legislative Assembly, Commencing January 1, 1851: Printed and Published Pursuant to Law Page 528, Image 538 (Vol. 1, 1851) available at The Making of Modern Law: Primary Sources.

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If any person shall go armed with a dirk, dagger, sword, pistol or pistols, or other offensive and dangerous weapon, without reasonable cause to fear an assault or other injury or violence to his person, or to his family, or property, he may, on compla...

If any person shall go armed with a dirk, dagger, sword, pistol or pistols, or other offensive and dangerous weapon, without reasonable cause to fear an assault or other injury or violence to his person, or to his family, or property, he may, on complaint of any other person having reasonable cause to fear an injury or breach of the peace, be required to find sureties for keeping the peace, for a term not exceeding six months, with the right of appealing as before provided.

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John Purdon, A Digest of the Laws of Pennsylvania, from the Year One Thousand Seven Hundred to the Twenty-Second Day of April, One Thousand Eight Hundred and Forty-Six Page 1389, Image 1389 (1852) available at The Making of Modern Law: Primary Sources.

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Act of 8th April, 1851, An Act Authorizing Francis Patrick Kenrick, Bishop of Philadelphia, to convey certain real estate in the borough of York, and a supplement to the charter of the said borough, § 4. Any person who shall willfully and maliciou...

Act of 8th April, 1851, An Act Authorizing Francis Patrick Kenrick, Bishop of Philadelphia, to convey certain real estate in the borough of York, and a supplement to the charter of the said borough, § 4. Any person who shall willfully and maliciously carry any pistol, gun, dirk knife, slung-shot, or deadly weapon in said borough of York, shall be deemed guilty of felony, and being thereof convicted shall be sentenced to undergo an imprisonment at hard labour for a term not less than six months nor more than one year, and shall give security for future good behavior for such sum and for such time as the court before whom such conviction shall take place may fix; and any person or persons who shall otherwise offend against the provisions of this section shall be fined in a sum not exceeding one hundred dollars, for the use of the borough of York, or be imprisoned for a term not exceeding one year, or both at the discretion of the court, or may be held to bail for future good behavior.

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Rev. Stats. of the State of Del. to the Year of Our Lord One Thousand Eight Hundred and Fifty-two, 333 (Dover, Delaware 1852)

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Any justice of the peace may also cause to be arrested . . . all who go armed offensively to the terror of the people, or are otherwise disorderly and dangerous.