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1925 Ind. Acts 496, ch. 207, An Act to Regulate and Control the Possession, Sale, and Use of Pistols and Revolvers in the State of Indiana

Sec 2. If any person shall, within the State of Indiana, commit or attempt to commit a crime, when armed with a pistol or revolver, and having no permit to carry the same, he shall, in addition to the punishment provided for the crime, be guilty of a felony and shall be punished by imprisonment for not less than one year and not more than five years.




N.Y., N.Y. Ordinance Ordained and Established by the Mayor, Aldermen and Commonality of the City of New-York, image 118-119 (this section starts on image 53 (1793).

(II) And be it further enacted by the authority aforesaid, Than if any person or persons, of what age, sex, or quality soever, from and after the said first day od June next, shall fire and discharge any gun, pistol, rocket, cracker, squib or other fire-work, in any street, lane or ally, garden or other inclosure, or from any house, or in any other place where persons frequently walk, to the southward of Fresh-Water; that then every such person or persons so offending, and being thereof convicted before on or more justice or justices of the peace for the said city and county of New York, either by the confession of the party or parties so offending, or the oath of one or more witness or witnesses, (which oath the said justice or justices of the peace is and are hereby empowered and required to administer) shall, for every such offense, forfeit the sum of twenty shillings…




An Act in relation to Crimes and Punishment, Ch. XXII, Title II, Sec. 14, in Acts, Resolutions and Memorials Passed at the Several Annual Sessions of the Legislative Assembly of the Territory of Utah 31 (Henry McEwan 1866).

“SEC. 14. If such oflender, at the timeof stuch robbery, is armed with a dangerous weapon, with intent, if resisted, to kill or maim the person robbed; or if, being so armed, he wound or strike the person robbed; or if lie have :lny conffederates aiding and abetting him in such robbery present, and so armed; he shall be punished by imprisonment for a term of not exceeding twenty-five years, and not less than ten years.”




An Act in relation to Crimes and Punishment, Ch. XXII, Title III, Sec. 48, in Acts, Resolutions and Memorials Passed at the Several Annual Sessions of the Legislative Assembly of the Territory of Utah 54 (Henry McEwan 1866).

“Sec. 48. If such offender, at the time of committing such burglary, is armed with a dangerous weapon, or so arm himself after having entered such dwelling house, or actually assault any person being lawfully therein; or have any confeder-ates present aiding and abetting in such burglary, he shall be punished by impris- onment for life, or any term of years.”




An Act in relation to Crimes and Punishment, Ch. XXII, Title VII, Sec. 102, in Acts, Resolutions and Memorials Passed at the Several Annual Sessions of the Legislative Assembly of the Territory of Utah 59 (Henry McEwan 1866).

“SEC. 102. If any person maliciously injure, deface or destroy any building or fixture attached thereto, or wilfully and maliciously injure, destroy or secrete any goods, chattels or valuable paper of another, or maliciously, prepare any dead fall, or dig any pit, or set any gun, or arrange any other trap to injure another’s person or property, he shall be imprisoned not more than one year, or fined not exceeding five hundred dollars, or both fined and imprisoned at the discretion of the court; and is liable to the party injured in a sum equal to three times the value of the property so destroyed or injured or damage sustained, in a civil action.”




An Act Defining Crime and Punishments, Ch. 49, Sec. 3, in Revised Statutes of the Territory of Iowa (Reprint 1911)

SEC. 3. That if any person shall, in the night season, break open and enter any mansion, house, shop, store or any other house or building whatever, boat or other water craft in which any person shall reside or dwell, and shall commit or attempt to commit any personal violence or abuse, or shall be so armed with any dangerous weapon, as to indicate a violent intention, the person so offending, shall upon conviction thereof, be fined in any sum not exceeding three hundred dollars. and be imprisoned in the cell or dungeon of the jail of the county, not exceeding thirty daye, at the discretion of the court.




An Act Defining Crime and Punishments, Ch. 49, Sec. 20, in Revised Statutes of the Territory of Iowa (Reprint 1911).

SEC. 20. If any person or persons, in this territory, shall make an assault with a deadly weapon, instrument, or other thing, with an intent to inflict upon the person of another, a bodily injury, where no considerable provocation ap- pears, or where the circumstances of the assault show an abandoned and ma- lignant heart, shall be adjudged to be a high misdemeanor, and any person who shall be duly convicted thereof, shall be fined in any sum not exceeding one thousand dollars, and imprisoned in the penitentiary, at hard labor, for a term not exceeding three years.




An Act Defining Crime and Punishments, Ch. 49, Sec. 51, in Revised Statutes of the Territory of Iowa (Reprint 1911)

SEC. 51. If any person shall maliciously stab or shoot any other person, with intent to kill, wound or maim such person, every person so offending, upon conviction thereof, shall be imprisoned in the penitentiary, and kept at hard labor, not more than twenty nor less than one year.




1934 N.J. Laws 394-95, A Further Supplement to an Act Entitled “An Act for the Punishment of Crimes,” ch. 155, §§ 1-5.

1. A gangster is hereby declared to be an enemy of the state. 2. Any person in whose possession is found a machine gun or a submachine gun is declared to be a gangster; provided, however, that nothing in this section contained shall be construed to apply to any member of the military or naval forces of this State, or to any police officer of the State or of any county or municipality thereof, while engaged in his official duties. 3. Any person, having no lawful occupation, who is apprehended while carrying a deadly weapon, without a permit so to do and how has been convicted at least three times of being a disorderly person, or who has been convicted of any crime, in this or in any other State, is declared to be a gangster. 4. Any person, not engaged in any lawful occupation, known to be a member of any gang consisting of two or more persons, who has been convicted at least three times of being a disorderly person, or who has been convicted of any crime, in this or in any other State, is declared to be a gangster; provided, however, that nothing in this section contained shall in any wise be construed to include any participant or sympathizer in any labor dispute. 5. Any person convicted of being a gangster under the provisions of this act shall be guilty of a high misdemeanor, and shall be punished by a fine not exceeding ten thousand dollars ($10,000.00), or by imprisonment not exceeding twenty years, or both.




1934 Ky. Acts 169-70, An Act . . . prescribing punishment for robbery or burglary . . ., ch. 52, § 1159(a).

That if any person shall commit acts of robbery, burglary . . . robbery of bank [sic] or safe, and in committing said act or acts shall use or display any pistol, gun or other firearms or deadly weapon of any character in so doing; upon conviction such person or persons shall be sentenced to death or life imprisonment in the discretion of the jury . . . .




1931 Ill. Laws 454, An Act to Regulate the Sale, Possession and Transportation of Machine Guns, § 7.

Any person committing or attempting to commit arson, assault, burglary, kidnapping, larceny, rioting, or robbery while armed with a machine gun shall be imprisoned in the penitentiary for his natural life, or for a term not less than five years.




1929 Ind. Acts 139, Criminal Offenses—Commission of or Attempt to Commit Crime While Armed with Deadly Weapon, ch.55, § 1.

Be it enacted by the general assembly of the State of Indiana, That any person who being over sixteen years of age, commits or attempts to commit either the crime of rape, robbery, bank robbery, petit larceny or grand larceny while armed with a pistol, revolver, rifle, shotgun, machine gun or any other firearm or any dangerous or deadly weapon, or while any other person present and aiding or assisting in committing or attempting ot commit either of said crimes is armed with any of said weapons, shall be guilty of a seperate felony in addition to the crimes above named and upon conviction shall be imprisoned for a determinate period of not less than ten years nor more than twenty years . . . .




1929 Me. Laws 206, An Act Defining the Crime of Burglary with Explosives and Providing the Punishment Therefor, ch. 244, §§ 1-2.

§ 1. Burglary with explosives, defined. Any person who, with intent to commit crime, breaks, and enters, either by day or by night, any building, whether inhabited or not, and opens or attempts to open any vault, safe or other secure place by the use of nitroglycerine, dynamite, gunpowder or any other explosive, shall be deemed guilty of burglary with explosives. § 2. Penalty. Any person duly convicted of burglary with explosives shall be punished by imprisonment for a term of not less than twenty nor more than forty years.




1929 Pa. Laws 777, An Act prohibiting the sale, giving away, transfer, purchasing, owning, possession and use of machine guns: § 3.

§ 3. Any person who shall commit, or attempt to commit, any crime within this Commonwealth, when armed with a machine gun, shall upon conviction of such crime or attempt to commit such crime, in addition to the punishment for the crime for which he has been convicted, be sentenced to separate and solitary confinement at labor for a term not exceeding ten years. Such additional penalty of imprisonment shall commence upon the expiration or termination of the sentence imposed for the crime of which he stands convicted, and shall not run concurrently with such sentence.




1927 Ind. Acts 53-54, Crimes—Burglary with Explosives, Electricity or Gas—Punishment, ch. 19, § 1.

Be it enacted by the general assembly of the State of Indiana, That any person who, with intent to commit a felony, breaks into and enters, either by day or night, any building, whether inhabited or not, and opens or attempts to open any vault, safe or other secure place by the use of nitroglycerin, dynamite, gunpowder or any other explosive, or by the use of electricity as a motive or burning or melting power or agency, or in any form, or by any electrical means whatsoever, or by the use of oxycetyline gas, or by any gas in any form whatsoever, shall be deemed guilty of burglary with explosives, electricity or gas, as the case may be and on conviction thereof shall be imprisoned for not less than ten years.




1927 Haw. Sess. Laws 209-217, AN ACT Regulating the Sale, Transfer and Possession of Certain Firearms and Ammunitions, and Amending Sections 2136, 2137, 2138, 2139, 2140, 2141, 2142, 2143, 2146 and 2147 of the Revised Laws of Hawaii 1925 (the “Small Arms Act”), §§ 1-3.

Section 1. Definitions. “Pistol” or “revolver” as used in this Act, means any firearm with barrel less than twelve inches in length. “Crime of Violence”, as used in this Act means any of the following crimes, namely, murder, manslaughter, rape, mayhem, assault to do great bodily harm, robbery, larceny, burglary and house-breaking. Section 2. Committing crime when armed. If any person, when armed with a pistol or revolver, shall commit or attempt to commit an act constituting a crime of violence, he may in addition to the punishment otherwise provided for the crime, be punished by imprisonment for not more than one year or by a fine of not more than one thousand dollars ($1,000.00) or by both; provided, that the act aforesaid be one which is capable of being committed or facilitated by means of a pistol or revolver. Section 3. Being armed prima facie evidence of intent. In the trial of a person for committing or attempting to commit a crime of violence, the fact that he was armed with a pistol or revolver and had no license to carry the same, shall be prima facie evidence of his intention to commit said crime of violence; provided, that the criminal act committed or attempted be one which is capable of being committed or facilitated by means of a pistol or revolver.




1927 Minn. Laws 407-08, An Act Relating to the Minimum Punishment or Penalty for Felonies Committed while Armed with a Firearm, ch. 294, § 1.

Penalty for felonies committed while armed with a firearm. That if any person shall commit a felony, or attempt to commit a felony, while armed with a pistol, revolver, gun or other firearm, with intent to use the same in the commission thereof, the penalty therefor, including any additional penalty which may be now or hereafter imposed by any law of this State for the commission of a crime of violence while armed with or having available any firearm, shall in the discretion of the trial judge be imprisonment for not less than five years; provided, that this Act shall not apply to reduce either the minimum or the maximum sentence now or hereafter provided by law for any offense for which the person has been convicted.




1927 R.I. Pub. Laws 256, An Act to Regulate the Possession of Firearms: §§ 1 and 2.

§ 1. When used in this act the following words and phrases shall be construed as follows: “pistol” shall include any Pistol or revolver, and any shot gun, rifle or similar weapon with overall less than twenty-six inches, but shall not include any pistol without a magazine or any pistol or revolver designed for the use of blank cartridges only. “Machine gun” shall include any weapon which shoots automatically and any weapon which shoots more than twelve shots semi-automatically without reloading. “Firearm shall include any machine gun or pistol. . . “Crime of violence” shall mean and include nay of the following crimes or any attempt to commit any of the same, viz. murder, manslaughter, rape, mayhem, assault or battery involving grave bodily injury, robbery, burglary, and breaking and entering. “sell” shall include let or hire, give, lend and transfer, and the word “purchase” shall include hire, accept and borrow, and the expression “purchasing” shall be construed accordingly. § 2. If any person shall commit or attempt to commit a crime of violence when armed with or having available any firearm, he may in addition to the punishment provided for such crime of violence be punished as provided in this act. In the trial of a person for committing or attempting to commit a crime of violence the fact that he was armed with or had available a pistol without license to carry the same, or was armed with or had available a machine gun, shall be prima facie evidence of his intention to commit said crime of violence.




1927 Md. Laws 156, § 388-B.

That not person, persons house, company, association or body corporate, shall deposit, keep or have in his, her, their or its possession any spirituous or fermented liquors, or intoxicating drinks of any kind whatsoever, or any article used or sold as a beverage in the composition of which, whiskey, brandy, high wines or alcoholic, spirituous or fermented liquors shall be an ingredient or ingredients, in any automobile or other vehicle in which any device for the prevention or arrest or apprehension of said motor vehicle, or the occupants thereof of the type commonly known as a smoke screen is carried, whether the said device be attached as a part of said motor vehicle in which any gun, pistol, revolver, rifle machine gun, or other dangerous or deadly weapon of any kind whatsoever is carried, whether in said automobile or vehicle, or on the person of any occupant of the same.




1926 Miss. Laws 272, An Act Defining the Crime of Burglary with Explosives and Providing the Punishment Therefor, ch. 176, §§ 1-2.

§ 1. [A]ny person, who, with intent to commit crime, breaks and enters, either by day or by night, any building, whether inhabited or not, and opens or attempts to open any vault, safe or other secure place by the use of nitroglycerine, dynamite, gunpowder or any other explosive, shall be deemed guilty of burglary with explosives. § 2. Any person duly convicted of burglary with explosives shall be punished by imprisonment for a term of not less than twenty-five nor more than forty years.




1925 Mich. Pub. Acts 473, An Act to Tegulate the Possession and Sale of Pistols, Revolvers and Guns; to Provide a Method of Licensing Those Carrying Such Weapons Concealed; and to Provide Penalties for Violations of Such Regulations, § 2-4.

§ 2. Any person who shall commit or attempt to commit a felony when armed with a pistol, revolver or gun, as defined in section one, shall, in addition to the punishment provided for committing the crime, be punished by imprisonment for not less than two nor more than five years within the discretion of the court. § 3. The court shall have power to sentence any person who may be convicted of a second offense to double the addition penalty imposed under section two thereof for carrying such concealed weapon without a license. § 4. In the trial of a person for the commission of murder, assault with intent to do great bodily harm, robbery, larceny, or any attempt to commit any of such offenses, the fact that he was armed with a pistol, revolver or gun as herein defined and had no permit to carry the same, shall be prima facie evidence of his intention to commit the crime with which he is charged[.]




1925 N.D. Laws 216–17, Pistols and Revolvers, ch. 174, § 2.

§ 2 Committing Crime When Armed. If any person shall commit, or attempt to commit, a crime when armed with a pistol or revolver, and has no permit to carry the same, he may be punished by imprisonment for not more than ten years, in addition to the punishment provided for the crime. Such imprisonment, if not exceeding one year, to be in the County jail, and if exceeding one year to be in the State Penitentiary.




1923 N.D. Laws 380, Pistols and Revolvers, ch. 266, § 2.

Sec. 2. Commiting Crime When Armed. If any person shall commit or attempt to commit a crime when armed with a pistol or revolver, and having no permit to carry the same, he shall be in addition to the punishment provided for the crime, be punished by imprisonment for not less than ten years.




1923 Cal. Stat. 696, An Act to Control and Regulate the Possession, Sale and Use of Pistols, Revolvers, and Other Firearms Capable of Being Concealed Upon the Person; To Prohibit the Manufacture, Sale, Possession or Carrying of Certain Other Dangerous Weapons Within this State; To Provide for Registering All Sales of Pistols, Revolvers or Other Firearms Capable of Being Concealed Upon the Person; To Prohibit the Carrying of Concealed Firearms Except by Lawfully Authorized Persons; To Provide for the Confiscation and Destruction of Such Weapons in Certain Cases; To Prohibit the Ownership, Use or Possession of Any of Such Weapons by Certain Classes of Persons; To Prescribe Penalties for Violations of This Act and Increased Penalties for Repeated Violations Hereof; To Authorize, In Proper Cases, The Granting of Licenses or Permits to Carry Firearms Concealed Upon the Person; To Provide for Licensing Retail Dealers in Such Firearms and Regulating Sales Thereunder; And To Repeal Chapter One Hundred Forty-Five of California Statutes of 1917, Relating to the Same Subject, ch. 339, § 3.

Sec. 3. If any person shall commit or attempt to commit any felony within this state while armed with any of the weapons mentioned in section one hereof or while armed with any pistol, revolver or other firearm capable of being concealed upon the person, without having a license or permit to carry such firearm as hereinafter provided, upon conviction of such felony, he shall in addition to the punishment prescribed for the crime of which he has been convicted, be punishable by imprisonment om a state prison for not less than five nor more than ten years…




1921 N.D. Laws 173, An Act to Prohibit Intoxicating Liquors and Beverages and Property Intended for Manufacture of Same; Prohibiting the Transportation of Liquor . . . , ch. 97, § 13.

Provided, however, that if the evidence in such case convinces the court that the person convicted of transporting intoxicating liquors in violation of this Act, was in charge of and used any wagon, buggy, automobile, water or aircraft, or other vehicle or conveyance not owned by him, or without permission of the owner, or when such vehicle or conveyance so sued was mortgaged property, or if there be in or upon such conveyance so used or upon any person therein any firearms, or guns, he shall be deemed guilty of a felony, and be punished by imprisonment in the penitentiary not less than six months and not more than five years.