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Year: 1776

N.H. Const. (1776)

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That general and field officers of the militia, on any vacancy, be appointed by the two houses, and all inferior officers be chosen by the respective companies.

1776-1777 N.J. Laws 6, An Act for the Inspection of Gunpowder, ch. 6, § 1.

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That any Person who, from and after the Publication of this Act, shall offer any Gun-Powder for Sale, without being previously inspected and marked as is herein after directed, shall forfeit, for every such Offence, the Sum of Five Shillings a Pound fo...

That any Person who, from and after the Publication of this Act, shall offer any Gun-Powder for Sale, without being previously inspected and marked as is herein after directed, shall forfeit, for every such Offence, the Sum of Five Shillings a Pound for every Pound weight so offered for Sale, and so in Proportion for greater or lesser quantity[.]

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Records Of The State Of Rhode Island And Providence Plantations In New England.Providence Page 18-19, Image 20-21 (1863) available at The Making of Modern Law: Primary Sources.

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An Act for the Inspection of Gunpowder, Manufactured within this State (1776). Be it enacted by this General Assembly, and by the authority thereof, it is enacted, that if any person or persons, within this state, shall vend or expose to sale any gunpo...

An Act for the Inspection of Gunpowder, Manufactured within this State (1776). Be it enacted by this General Assembly, and by the authority thereof, it is enacted, that if any person or persons, within this state, shall vend or expose to sale any gunpowder, manufactured within the same, unless said gunpowder be packed in a good dry cask, marked with the two first letters of the manufacturer’s name, and hath been examined and approved by the inspector of gunpowder, for said state, and by him marked with the letters U.S.A., and such other marks as are necessary to distinguish the several sorts of gunpowder: the person or persons so offending shall forfeit and pay £6 lawful money, for every cask so exposed to sale; to be recovered by bill, plaint or information, upon conviction before any court of record within this state; which forfeiture shall one moiety thereof be given to the informer, and the other be paid in to the general treasury of the state. And be it further enacted by the authority, aforesaid, that the said inspector be paid out of the general treasury nine-pence, lawful money, for every cask so marked and inspected by him.

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1776 Del. Const, art. 28.

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To prevent any violence or force being used at the said elections, no person shall come armed to any of them, and no muster of the militia shall be made on that day; nor shall any battalion or company give in their votes immediately succeeding each oth...

To prevent any violence or force being used at the said elections, no person shall come armed to any of them, and no muster of the militia shall be made on that day; nor shall any battalion or company give in their votes immediately succeeding each other, if any other voter, who offers to vote, objects thereto; nor shall any battalion or company, in the pay of the continent, or of this or any other State, be suffered to remain at the time and place of holding the said elections, nor within one mile of the said places respectively, for twenty-four hours before the opening said elections, nor within twenty-four hours after the same are closed, so as in any manner to impede the freely and conveniently carrying on the said election: Provided always, That every elector may, in a peaceable and orderly manner, give in his vote on the said day of election.

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1776, Del. Const., art. 9.

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The president, with the advice and consent of the privy council, may embody the militia, and act as captain-general and commander-in-chief of them, and the other military force of this State, under the laws of the same.

1776 Pa. Laws 11, An Ordinance RespectingThe Arms Of Non-Associators, § 1

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The colonel or next officer in command of every battalion of militia in this state is hereby authorized, empowered and required to collect, receive and take all the arms in his district or township nearest to such officer which are in the hands of non-...

The colonel or next officer in command of every battalion of militia in this state is hereby authorized, empowered and required to collect, receive and take all the arms in his district or township nearest to such officer which are in the hands of non-associators in the most expeditious and effectual manner in his power, and shall give to the owners receipts for such arms, . . .

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Act of Mar. 14, 1776, ch. VII, 1775-1776 Mass. Act at 31–32, 35.

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Chap. VII An Act for the executing in the Colony of the Massachusetts Bay, in New England, one Resolve of the American Congress, dated March 14, 1776, recommending the disarming of such persons as are notoriously disaffected to the cause of America, or...

Chap. VII An Act for the executing in the Colony of the Massachusetts Bay, in New England, one Resolve of the American Congress, dated March 14, 1776, recommending the disarming of such persons as are notoriously disaffected to the cause of America, or who refuse to associate to defend by arms the United American Colonies, against the hostile attemps of the British fleets and armies, and for the restraining and punishing persons who are inimical to the rights and liberties of the said United Colonies, and for directing the Proceedings therein. Whereas on the fourteenth of March One Thousand Seven Hundred and Seventy-five, a certain resolve was made and passed by the American Congress, of the following tenor, viz. “Resolved, That it be recommended to the several Assemblies, Conventions and Councils, or Committees of Safety of the United Colonies, immediately to cause all persons to be disarmed within their respective Colonies, who are notoriously disaffected to the cause of America, or who have not associated and refuse to associate to defend by arms these United Colonies, against the hostile attempts of the British Fleets and Armies; and to apply the arms taken from such persons in each respective Colony, in the first place, to the arming of the Continental Troops raised in said Colony; in the next, to the arming such troops as are raised by the Colony for its own defense, and the residue to be applied to the arming [sic] the associators; that their arms when taken, be appraised by indifferent persons, and such as are applied to the arming Continental Troops, be paid for by Congress; and the residue by the respective Assemblies, Conventions or Councils, or Committees of Safety.” Be it therefore enacted by the Council, and House of Representatives in General Court assembled, and by the Authority of the same, that every male person above sixteen years of age, resident in any town or place in this colony, who shall neglect or refuse to subscribe a printed or written declaration of the form and tenor herein after prescribed, upon being required thereto by the Committee of Correspondence, Inspection and Safety for the town or place in which he dwells, or any of them, shall be disarmed and have taken from him in manner hereafter directed, all such arms, ammunities and warlike implements, as by the strictest search can be found in his possession or belonging to him; which declaration shall be in the form and words following, viz . . . Provided, nevertheless, and be it further enacted, that nothing in this shall be Act shall be construed to extend to the disarming, disqualifying or any way punishing any of the denomination of christians called Quakers, for not fighting the aforesaid declaration, in case upon being required to sign the following Declaration, and having the same tendered to him, shall not refuse or neglect to subscribe it.

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Proceedings of the Conventions of the Province of Maryland Held at the City of Annapolis, in 1774, 1775, & 1776 Page 147, Image 147 (1836) available at The Making of Modern Law: Primary Sources.

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[1776 Md. Laws 146.Resolved, that no muskets or rifles, except by the owner thereof on his removal to reside out of this province, or any gun barrels, gun locks, or bayonets, be carried out of his province, without the leave of the council of safety fo...

[1776 Md. Laws 146.Resolved, that no muskets or rifles, except by the owner thereof on his removal to reside out of this province, or any gun barrels, gun locks, or bayonets, be carried out of his province, without the leave of the council of safety for the time being.]

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