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Year: 1814

Haywood, A Manual of the Laws of North-Carolina pt. 2 at 40 (1814) (N.C. constable oath).

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You shall swear that you will well and truly serve the State of North Carolina in the office of a constable, you shall see and cause the peace of the State to be well and duly preserved and kept according to your power, you shall arrest all such persons a...

You shall swear that you will well and truly serve the State of North Carolina in the office of a constable, you shall see and cause the peace of the State to be well and duly preserved and kept according to your power, you shall arrest all such persons as in your sight shall right or go armed offensively, or shall commit or make any riot, affray or other breach of the peace; you shall do your best endeavor, upon complaint to you made, to apprehend all felons, and rioters, or persons riotously assembled; and if any such offender shall make resistance with force, you shall make hue and cry, and shall pursue them according to law: You shall faithfully, and without delay, execute and return all lawful precepts to you directed: You shall well and duly, according to your knowledge, power and ability, do and execute all other things belonging to the office of a constable, so long as you shall continue in this office. So help you God.

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An Act concerning the Kaskaskia Indians, in Nathaniel Pope, Laws of the Territory of Illinois (1815).

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That it shall not be lawful for any person whatever without license from the Governor or some sub-agent appointed by him to purchase or receive by gift or other wise of any of the before mentioned Indians, any horse mare, gun tomohaw, knife, blanket, s...

That it shall not be lawful for any person whatever without license from the Governor or some sub-agent appointed by him to purchase or receive by gift or other wise of any of the before mentioned Indians, any horse mare, gun tomohaw, knife, blanket, shrouding, calico, saddle, bridle, or any goods wares or merchandize whatever, that all such sales or gifts shall be considered as fraudulent on the part of the buyer or receiver and that any whit eperson or free person of coulour whatever so buying or receiving any such articles of any one of those Indians shall be liable to pay a fine of twenty dollars to be recovered before a justice of the peace . . . .”

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1814 Mass. Acts 464, An Act In Addition To An Act, Entitled “An Act To Provide For The Proof Of Fire Arms, Manufactured Within This Commonwealth,” ch. 192, § 1

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...from and after the passing of this act, all musket barrels and pistol barrels, manufactured within this Commonwealth, shall, before the same shall be sold, and before the same shall be stocked, be proved by the person appointed according to the prov...

…from and after the passing of this act, all musket barrels and pistol barrels, manufactured within this Commonwealth, shall, before the same shall be sold, and before the same shall be stocked, be proved by the person appointed according to the provisions of an act . . . with a charge of powder equal in weight to the ball which fits the bore of the barrel to be proved . . . § 2. That if any person of persons, from and after the passing of this act, shall manufacture, within this Commonwealth, any musket or pistol, or shall sell and deliver, or shall knowingly purchase any musket or pistol, without having the barrels first proved according to the provisions of the first section of this act, marked and stamped according the provisions of the first section of the act to which this is an addition . . .

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1814 Miss. Laws 16, An Act To Authorize The Governor Of Mississippi Territory, To Accept Of The Services Of Citizens Exempted From Militia Duty, § 2

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Immediately on the governor’s acceptance of any number of volunteers, by virtue of this act, each private shall proceed to provide himself with a good rifle, musket or shot gun with four flints, twenty rounds of powder, ball, or buckshot, best su...

Immediately on the governor’s acceptance of any number of volunteers, by virtue of this act, each private shall proceed to provide himself with a good rifle, musket or shot gun with four flints, twenty rounds of powder, ball, or buckshot, best suited to his gun, together with the most convenient accoutrements. The commissioned officers shall be armed with swords; and the arms and accoutrements of all such volunteers shall be exempted from executions in payment of debts and their persons, when on service, free from arrest in civil cases.

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