Duke Center for Firearms Law
Duke Law logo
Repository of Historical Gun Laws

Year: 1841

Joseph Rockwell Swan, Statutes of the State of Ohio, of a General Nature, in Force, December 7, 1840; Also, the Statutes of a General Nature, Passed by the General Assembly at Their Thirty-Ninth Session, Commencing December 7, 1840 Page 257, Image 273 (1841) available at The Making of Modern Law: Primary Sources.

| |
Crimes and Misdemeanors - Third Class, 130, § VI. That if any person or persons shall play bullets, along or across any street in any town or village, within this state; or if any person or persons shall run any horse or horses within the limits of any s...

Crimes and Misdemeanors – Third Class, 130, § VI. That if any person or persons shall play bullets, along or across any street in any town or village, within this state; or if any person or persons shall run any horse or horses within the limits of any such town or village; or if any person or persons shall shoot or fire a gun at a target within the limits of any recorded town plat in this state; every person or persons so offending, shall be fined in a sum not exceeding five dollars, nor less than fifty cents.

Read More

John J. Ormond, The Code of Alabama Page 588-89, Image 608-09 (1852) available at The Making of Modern Law: Primary Sources

| |

Indictable Offences, § 3273. Any one who carries concealed about his person a bowie knife, or knife or instrument of the like kind or description by whatever name called, or air gun, must, on conviction, be fined not less than fifty or more than t...

Indictable Offences, § 3273. Any one who carries concealed about his person a bowie knife, or knife or instrument of the like kind or description by whatever name called, or air gun, must, on conviction, be fined not less than fifty or more than three hundred dollars. § 3274. Any one who carries concealed about his person a pistol, or any other description of fire arms, not being threatened with, or having good reason to apprehend an attack, or travelling, or setting out on a journey, must, on conviction, be fined not less than fifty nor more than three hundred dollars. § 3275. In an indictment under the preceding section, it is sufficient to charge that the defendant carried concealed about his person a pistol or other description of fire arms; and the excuse must be made out by the defendant, to the satisfaction of the jury.

Read More

1841 Del. Laws 198, A Supplement to the Act Entitled “An Act for Establishing the Boundaries of the Town of Dover, and for Other Purposes Therein Mentioned, § 2.

| |

And be it enacted, That it shall be the duty of the said commissioners, justices and constable to suppress, extinguish and prevent all bonfires from being lighted or kept up on the public square of the said town: and to suppress and prevent the firing ...

And be it enacted, That it shall be the duty of the said commissioners, justices and constable to suppress, extinguish and prevent all bonfires from being lighted or kept up on the public square of the said town: and to suppress and prevent the firing of guns, crackers or squibs, by boys or others, within the limits of the said town.

Read More

1841 Me. Laws 709, ch. 169, § 16.

| |

If any person shall go armed with a dirk, dagger, sword, pistol, or other offensive and dangerous weapon, without reasonable cause to fear an assault or other injury or violence to his person, or to his family or property, he may, on complaint of any p...

If any person shall go armed with a dirk, dagger, sword, pistol, or other offensive and dangerous weapon, without reasonable cause to fear an assault or other injury or violence to his person, or to his family or property, he may, on complaint of any person having resonable cause to fear an injury or breach of the peace, be required to find sureties for keeping the peace, for a term not exceeding six months, with the right of appealing as before provided.

Read More

Chas. Ben. Darwin, Ordinances of the City of Burlington, with Head Notes and an Analytic Index Page 149-150, Image 149-150 (1856) available at The Making of Modern Law: Primary Sources.

| |

Burlington City Ordinances, Shooting Batteries, Be it ordained by the Mayor and Aldermen of the City of Burlington, § 1. That when application shall be made to the Mayor and Aldermen of the city of Burlington in council assembled, by any gunsmith ...

Burlington City Ordinances, Shooting Batteries, Be it ordained by the Mayor and Aldermen of the City of Burlington, § 1. That when application shall be made to the Mayor and Aldermen of the city of Burlington in council assembled, by any gunsmith conducting a gun shop in said city, it may be lawful for said Council to authorize the committee on internal improvements to instruct the applicant in what manner and of what materials he shall erect a shooting battery within said city, and said committee are required in all cases when such application is made, to judge of the propriety of erecting such battery upon the ground of the applicant, having special regard to the location. § 2. And be it further ordained, that every shooting battery in said city shall be kept in good and safe condition by the owner or occupant, and upon complaint being made of the insecurity of any shooting battery in said city, it may be lawful to deprive such owner or occupant of the right to use such battery, and subject him to all the penalties applicable to the case of firing guns, etc. under the ordinance on misdemeanors. § 3. That no person other than the gunsmith for whose special benefit this privilege is granted, shall be permitted to shoot at a mark or fire any gun at said battery, and shooting at said battery by said gunsmith shall be allowed by law.

Read More

1841 Del. Laws 430, An Act Concerning Fees, ch. 368, § 1.

| |

Justices of the Peace shall receive . . . For licenses to negroes to keep a gun, twenty five cents.

1841 Mich. Pub. Acts 30, An Act To Amend An Act Entitled “An Act To Incorporate The Village of Ypsilanti, And The Acts Or Acts Amendatory Thereof,” §14.

| |

And the said common council shall have power . . . relative to the keeping and sale of gunpowder in said village[.]

1841 Ala. Acts 148–49, Of Miscellaneous Offences, ch. 7, § 4.

| |

Everyone who shall hereafter carry concealed about his person, a bowie knife, or knife or instrument of the like kind or description, by whatever name called, dirk or any other deadly weapon, pistol or any species of firearms, or air gun, unless such p...

Everyone who shall hereafter carry concealed about his person, a bowie knife, or knife or instrument of the like kind or description, by whatever name called, dirk or any other deadly weapon, pistol or any species of firearms, or air gun, unless such person shall be threatened with, or have good cause to apprehend an attack, or be travelling, or setting out on a journey, shall on conviction, be fined not less than fifty nor more than three hundred dollars: It shall devolve on the person setting up the excuse here allowed for carrying concealed weapons, to make it out by proof, to the satisfaction of the jury; but no excuse shall be sufficient to authorize the carrying of an air gun, bowie knife, or knife of the like kind or description.

Read More

1841 Md. Laws 114, An Act To Incorporate The Mount Orange Cemetery, In The County of Baltimore, ch. 148, § 4

| |

Any Person who shall willfully destroy, mutilate, deface, injure or remove any tomb, monument, grave stone, or other structure, placed in the cemetery . . . or shall shoot or discharge any gun, or other fire arms, within the said limits, shall be consi...

Any Person who shall willfully destroy, mutilate, deface, injure or remove any tomb, monument, grave stone, or other structure, placed in the cemetery . . . or shall shoot or discharge any gun, or other fire arms, within the said limits, shall be considered guilty of a misdemeanor . . .

Read More

1841 Ohio Laws 73, Local Acts vol. 40, An Act to Incorporate the Woodland Cemetery Association of Dayton, § 5.

| |

That any person who shall willfully . . . shoot or discharge any gun within the limits aforesaid, shall be deemed guilty of a misdemeanor, and shall, upon conviction thereof, before the mayor of the city of Dayton, or any justice of the peace of the to...

That any person who shall willfully . . . shoot or discharge any gun within the limits aforesaid, shall be deemed guilty of a misdemeanor, and shall, upon conviction thereof, before the mayor of the city of Dayton, or any justice of the peace of the township of Dayton, be punished by a fine not less than five dollars, nor more than fifty dollars, according to the nature and aggravation of the offence[.]

Read More