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An Ordinance to Prevent the Use of Fire Arms, etc., §§1-4, Ordinances of the City of Hudson (1855).

Ҥ1. No person shall within this city carry any gun on lands not his own, without the written permission of the owner of legal possessor of such lands.
§2. No person shall within this city fire or discharge any gun, pistol, cannon or fowling-piece or other fire-arms, unless in defence of his or her property or person, nor let off any squibs, crackers or other fireworks, unless by permission of the city authorities.
§3. Each and every person convicted of violating any of the provisions of this ordinance, shall pay a fine of five dollars, the one half to be paid to the city treasurer for the use of the city, and the other half to the person prosecuting the same, together with the costs of prosecution, and stand committed until the same be paid.
§4. It shall and may be lawful for any such owner or possessor as aforesaid, to apprehend any and every such person or persons violating any of the provisions of the first section of this ordinance, and take him or them before a justice of the peace in this city, as soon as conveniently may be, in order that he or they may be dealt with according to the law ; and every such person who may perform this service, shall be entitled to the same assistance and protection, and subject to the same restrictions and liabilities as a constable would be on the same occasion.”

1855, NJ, Ordinances of the City of Hudson, An Ordinance to Prevent the Use of Fire Arms, etc., §§1-4


Charter of the City of Hudson, in the State of New Jersey, As passed by the Legislature of the State of New Jersey, April 11th, 1855; Amended by an Act of Said Legislature, Passed February 29th, 1860, with Amendments Passed March 6th, 1862 ; Amendments Passed March 19th, 1862 ; Amendments Passed March 18th, 1863 ; Amendments Passed March24th, 1864 ; Amendments Passed March 24th, 1865 ; Amendments Passed March 24th, 1866 ; Amendments Passed March 24th, 1867 ; [sic] (Hudson City, NJ: W.D. M’Gregor, Newark Avenue, 1868), 109. An Ordinance to Prevent the Use of Fire Arms, etc., §§1-4. Approved 15 Nov. 1855.

NB: An unusual feature of this source is that it has within it another, separate, work and title page. The bibliographic details of which are as follows: Ordinances of the City of Hudson. Ordered by Resolution of the Mayor and Common Council.- [sic] (Hudson City, NJ: W.D. McGregor, 1868), 93-225.




Acts & Resolves of Vermont, 25, no. 24, An Act to Prevent Traffic in Intoxicating Liquors for the Purpose of Drinking, §15 (1852).

“Sec. 15. It shall be the duty of any sheriff, sheriff’s deputy, constable, selectman, or grand juror, if he shall have information that any intoxicating liquor is kept or sold in any tent, shanty, hut or place of any kind for selling refreshments in any public place, except dwelling houses, on or near the ground of any cattle show, agricultural exhibition, military muster or public occasion of any kind, to search such suspected place without warrant, and if such officer shall find upon the premises any intoxicating liquor, he shall seize and apprehend the keeper or keepers of such place, and take them, with the liquor so found and seized, forthwith, or as soon as conveniently may be, before some justice of the peace of the town in which the same was found ; and thereupon such officer shall make a written complaint under oath, and subscribed by him, to such justice ; and upon proof that such liquor is intoxicating, that the same was found in the possession of the accused, in a tent, shanty, or other place as aforesaid, he or they shall be sentenced to imprisonment, in the county jail of the county where such offence was committed, for thirty days, and the liquor so seized shall be destroyed by order of said justice, as provided in the twelfth section of this act ; and if any person, apprehended under this section and sentenced as aforesaid, shall claim an appeal, before his appeal is allowed, he shall recognize, with good and sufficient sureties, in the sum of one hundred dollars, that he will prosecute his said appeal to effect, and pay all fines and costs, and suffer such penalty as may be awarded against him. And if he is convicted upon such appeal, he shall, in addition to the penalty imposed by such justice, pay a fine of ten dollars to the town where said liquor was seized as aforesaid. And any person resisting an officer in the execution of his duties under this or any other section of this act, shall be liable to the same penalties as are provided by law for resisting a sheriff in the execution of legal process.”

1852, VT, An Act to Prevent Traffic in Intoxicating Liquors for the Purpose of Drinking, §15


The Acts and Resolves Passed by the General Assembly of the State of Vermont at the October Session, 1852 (Montpelier, VT: E. P. Walton & Son, 1852), 25. Acts & Resolves 25, no. 24 – An Act to Prevent Traffic in Intoxicating Liquors for the Purpose of Drinking, §15. Approved 23 Nov., 1852.




Temporary Erections for Sale of Liquors or Gaming, Near Parade Ground, May Be Abated as Nuisances. In Public Acts Passed by the General Assembly of the State of Connecticut, Ch. 82, §5 (1859).

“Sec. 5. If any booth shed, tent, or other temporary erection, within one mile of any military parade-ground, muster-field or encampment, shall be used and occupied for the sale of spirituous or intoxicating liquor, or for the purpose of gambling, the officer commanding said parade-ground, muster-field or encampment, the sheriff or deputy-sheriff of the county, or any justice of the peace, selectman, or constable of the town in which such booth, shed, tent, or other temporary erection is situated, upon having notice or knowledge that the same is so used or occupied, shall notify the owner or occupant thereof to vacate and close the same immediately; and, if said owner or occupant shall refuse or neglect so to do, said commanding officer, sheriff, deputy-sheriff, justice of the peace, selectman or constable, may forthwith abate such booth, shed, tent, or other such temporary erection, as a nuisance, and may pull down or otherwise destroy the same, with the assistance of any force, civil or military.”

1859, CT, Temporary Erections for Sale of Liquors or Gaming, Near Parade Ground, May Be Abated as Nuisances


Public Acts Passed by the General Assembly of the State of Connecticut, May Session, 1859 (Hartford, CT: Day & Clark State Printers, 1859), 62. Ch. 82 An Act in Addition to and in Alteration of “An Act for Forming and Conducting the Military Force,” §5 Temporary Erections for Sale of Liquors or Gaming, Near Parade Ground, May Be Abated as Nuisances. Approved 24 June, 1859.




An Ordinance to Prevent the Firing of Guns, Fire-Arms, or Fire-Works, §§1-2. In Laws and Ordinances, of a General and Local Nature, for the Government of the City of Cleveland (1854).

Ҥ1. Be it ordained by the City Council of the City of Cleveland, That it shall be unlawful for any person to fire or discharge and cannon, gun, pistol or fire-arms of any kind, within the city, unless it be on some occasion of military parade, and then by order of some officer having the command.
§2. That it shall be unlawful for any person to fire, set off, discharge, cast or throw, any squib, rocket, cracker, or other combustible fire-works, within the city.”

1854, OH, An Ordinance to Prevent the Firing of Guns, Fire-Arms, or Fire-Works


Laws and Ordinances, of a General and Local Nature, for the Government of the City of Cleveland (Cleveland, OH: W. W. & E. Bruce, 1854), 12-13. An Ordinance to Prevent the Firing of Guns, Fire-Arms, or Fire-Works, §§1-2. Passed 14 June, 1854.




An Act for the More Effectual Suppression of Drinking Houses and Tippling Shops, §10, Acts & Resolves of the General Assembly of the State of Rhode Island (1853).

“It shall be the duty of any mayor, alderman, city marshal, city or town sergeant, constable or police officer, of any city or town, if he shall have information that any ale, wine, rum, or other strong or malt liquors, or any mixed liquors as aforesaid, are kept for sale or sold in any tent, shanty, hut or place of any kind for selling refreshments in any public place, on or near the ground of any cattle show, agricultural exhibition, military muster or public occasion of any kind, to search such suspected place, and if such officer shall find upon the premises any ale, wine, rum, or other strong or malt liquors, or any mixed liquors as aforesaid, he shall seize them and apprehend the keeper or keepers of such place, and take them with the liquors and the vessels containing them, so found and seized, forthwith or as soon as may be convenient, before some justice of the peace, or court exercising the jurisdiction of at justice of the peace, of the town where found, and thereupon such officer shall make a written complaint under oath, and subscribed by him, to such justice or court, that ale, wine, rum, or other strong or malt liquors, or mixed liquors, a part of which is ale, wine, rum, or other strong or malt liquors, was found in the possession of such keeper or keepers, in a tent, shanty, hut, or place for selling refreshments, and upon proof that said liquors are either ale, wine, rum, or other strong or malt liquors, or mixed liquors as aforesaid, that they were found in the possession of the accused, in a tent, shanty or other place as aforesaid, for sale, he or they shall be sentenced to imprisonment in the county jail of the same county for twenty days, and the liquor and vessels so seized shall be dealt with, by order of such justice or court, as provided in the ninth section of this act. But from the sentence and order of said justice or court as aforesaid, the defendant may appeal to the Court of Common Pleas next to be holden in the same county after ten days; in the same manner, and upon the same terms and conditions and with the like effect, as prescribed in section 6th of this act. And in case of such appeal, if the final decision shall be against the appellant, sentence as aforesaid shall be passed upon him by the appellate court, and the liquor and vessels seized as aforesaid shall be dealt with as aforesaid.”

Full Text: HeinOnline (subscription required)


Acts & Resolves of the General Assembly of the State of Rhode Island and Providence Plantations Passed January, A. D., 1853, Being the Adjournment of the October Session; with the Roll of Members, and the Reports Ordered to Be Published (Providence, RI: Sayles, Miller & Simons, 1853), 238-239. An Act for the More Effectual Suppression of Drinking Houses and Tippling Shops, §10. Passed at the January Session, 1853.




Temporary Buildings within One Mile of Muster Field, Used for Sale of Intoxicating Liquors, May Be Removed, Acts and Resolves of Maine, Ch. 265 “An Act to Organize and Discipline the Militia,” §73 (1856).

“Sect. 73. The mayor and aldermen of any city, or the selectmen of any town, upon complaint made to them under oath, that the complainant has reason to believe that any booth, shed, or other temporary erection, situated within one mile of any muster field, is used and occupied for the sale of spirituous or fermented liquors, or for the purpose of gaming for money, or other property, may, if they consider the complaint well founded, order the owner or occupant thereof to vacate and close the same immediately ; and if the owner or occupant shall refuse or neglect so to do, the said mayor and aldermen or selectmen may forthwith abate such booth, shed or other temporary erection, as a nuisance, and pull down or otherwise destroy the same in any manner they may choose, or through the agency of any force, civil or military, which they may see fit to employ.”

1856, ME, Temporary Buildings within One Mile of Muster Field, Used for Sale of Intoxicating Liquors, May Be Removed


Acts and Resolves Passed by the Thirty-Fifth Legislature of the State of Maine, A. D. 1856 (Augusta, ME: 1856), 97. Ch. 265 An Act to Organize and Discipline the Militia, §73 Temporary Buildings within One Mile of Muster Field, Used for Sale of Intoxicating Liquors, May Be Removed. Approved 9 April, 1856.




An Act to Prohibit the Carrying or Wearing of Concealed Weapons, Acts of a General Nature of the State of Ohio, §§1-2 (1859).

“Section 1. Be it enacted by the General Assembly of the State of Ohio, That whoever shall carry a weapon or weapons, concealed on or about his person, such as a pistol, bowie knife, dirk, or any other dangerous weapon, shall be deemed guilty of a misdemeanor, and on conviction of the first offense shall be fined not exceeding two hundred dollars, or imprisoned in the county jail not more than thirty days; and for the second offense, not exceeding five hundred dollars, or imprisoned in the county jail not more than three months, or both, at the discretion of the court.
Sec. 2. If it shall be proved to the jury, from the testimony on the trial of any case presented under the first section of this act, that the accused was, at the time of carrying any of the weapon or weapons aforesaid, engaged in the pursuit of any lawful business, calling, or employment, and that the circumstances in which he was placed at the time aforesaid were such as to justify a prudent man in carrying the weapon or weapons aforesaid for the defense of his person, property or family, the jury shall acquit the accused.”

Full Text: HeinOnline (subscription required)


Acts of a General Nature and Local Laws and Joint Resolutions, Passed by the General Assembly, of the State of Ohio: At its Second Session, Begun and Held in the City of Columbus, January 3, 1859, and the Fifty-Seventh Year of Said State, vol. 56 (Columbus, OH: Richard Nevins, 1859), 56-57. An Act to Prohibit the Carrying or Wearing of Concealed Weapons, §§1-2. Enacted 18 March, 1859.




1859, NJ, An Ordinance to Prevent Firing of Guns, &c., in the City of Hoboken §§1-3, City Ordinances of Hoboken, NJ (1859).

“Section 1. That no person or persons shall fire or discharge any cannon, gun, pistol, or fire-arms of any description, or fire, explode, or set off any squib cracker or other thing, containing powder or other combustibles or explosive material within the corporate limits of Hoboken, without the permission of the mayor, in writing, and subject to the restrictions and conditions contained in such written permission under the penalty of five dollars for each and every offense, but nothing contained in this section shall be construed to extend to any military parade exercise or review of the Hudson Brigade or any company thereof.
Sec. 2. That no person or persons shall keep or maintain or cause to be kept or maintained within the corporate limits of Hoboken, any target or shooting grounds, where shooting or firing at a target or any or [sic] other mark, shall be practiced within the like permission, as mentioned in the last preceding section, under the penalty of fifty dollars for each and every such offense.
Sec. 3. That it shall be and hereby is made the special duties of all police officers of said City and all other persons charged with the keeping of the peace in said City, to cause the penalties in this ordinance to be inforced against all persons offending against its provisions.”

1859, NJ, An Ordinance to Prevent Firing of Guns, &c., in the City of Hoboken


City Ordinances Now in Force, Passed by The Mayor and Council of the City of Hoboken From March 28, 1855 to January 1, 1872 (Hoboken, NJ: A. O. Evans, Steam Book and Job Printer, 56 Washington Street, 1872), 38. An Ordinance to Prevent Firing of Guns, &c., in the City of Hoboken §§1-3. Approved 28 Nov., 1859.




An Ordinance Prohibiting the Carrying of Firearms, Ordinances of the Corporation of Georgetown (1859).

“Be it ordained by the Board of Aldermen and Board of Common Council of the Corporation of Georgetown, That from and after the 1st of April, 1859, it shall not be lawful for any person or persons to have about their persons any concealed deadly or dangerous weapons, such as daggers, pistols, bowie-knives, dirk-knives, colt, slung-shots, or brass or other metallic knuckles, within the limits of this Corporation ; and any person or persons who shall be duly convicted of so carrying or having on their persons any such weapons, shall forfeit and pay upon such convictions not less than five dollars nor more than twenty dollars, which fine shall be prosecuted and recovered in the same manner as other fines and forfeitures according to this Corporation are sued for and recovered: Provided, That the police officers and military, when on duty, shall be exempt from such fines and forfeitures. And be it further enacted, That all such weapons named above shall be taken away from the persons on whom they may be found, and deposited with the Mayor.”

1859, DC, An Ordinance Prohibiting the Carrying of Firearms, Ordinances of the Corporation of Georgetown


Ordinances of the Corporation of Georgetown, from January, 1859, to January, 1860, with a Table of Contents (Washington, D.C.: Thomas McGill, 1860), 22-23. An Ordinance Prohibiting the Carrying of Firearms, &c. Approved 2 April, 1859.




How Firearms May Be Used and what Quantity of Gun Powder May Be Kept, Ordinances of the City of Kenosha, Ordinance no. 8, §1 & §5 (1858).

“Sec. 1. Be it ordained by the common council of the city of Kenosha: That no person shall fire or discharge any cannon, rifle, gun, pistol, or fire arms of any description, or fire, explode, or set off any squib, cracker, or other thing containing powder or other combustible or explosive material in any street, alley, or public ground within this city south of a line running through Lemon street from the lake to the west line of the corporation, and east of West Main Street, without the permission of the common council, or the written permission of the mayor, which permission shall limit the time of such firing, and shall be subject to be revoked by the mayor or common council at any time after it has been granted. — Any person who shall violate this section shall for each offence forfeit and pay a penalty of three dollars; and in default of the payment of such penalty, shall be imprisoned in the county jail two days, and one half of each fine imposed in such case when collected shall be paid to the person who shall make the complaint before any justice of the peace.”

“Sec. 5. No person shall be allowed to keep any gunpowder in any occupied building within the limits of this city without permission of the council;– and no person shall keep in any such building a greater quantity than ten pounds; which shall be kept in a close tin canister or canisters. Every person violating any provisions of this section, shall, upon conviction thereof, be fined twenty dollars, which it shall be lawful for the treasurer of the fire department of this city to sue for in the name of the city of Kenosha; and such fines when collected shall be paid to the said treasurer for the use of the fire department; and in default of such payment, the person or persons convicted shall be imprisoned in the county jail of this county for the term of ten days.”

1858, WI, How Firearms May Be Used and what Quantity of Gun Powder May Be Kept, Ordinances of the City of Kenosha, Ordinance no. 8, §1 & §5


The Revised Charter and Ordinances of the City of Kenosha, With the By-Laws of the Council (Kenosha, WI: Telegraph Book and Job Office, 1866), 95-97. Ordinance no. VIII, For the Security of Persons and Property, §1 & §5. Passed 20 March, 1858.




An Ordinance to Establish a Magazine, and Regulate the Sale of Powder, §3, General Ordinances of the City of Cleveland (1856).

“Section. 3. No person shall keep within the city, any quantity of gunpowder exceeding twenty-five pounds, or of gun cotton exceeding five pounds, for a longer period than twenty-four hours, except in the powder magazine; and said twenty-five pounds shall be kept in tin or copper canisters, neither of which shall contain over seven pounds and shall be labelled “gunpowder,” and be kept near the front or rear entrance of every building in which it is contained.”

1856, OH, An ordinance to establish a magazine, and regulate the sale of powder, §3


Standing Rules of Order of the Cleveland City Council, with a Catalogue of the Mayors and Councils of the City of Cleveland, from its Organization, April, 1856, to April, 1871, and Officers of the City Government for 1872 (Cleveland, OH: Fairbanks, Benedict & Co., 1872), 128. NB: An unusual feature of this source is that it has within it another, separate, work and title page. The bibliographic details of which are as follows: WM. C. Bunts and Geo S. Kain, General Ordinances of the City of Cleveland, in Force July 1, 1872 (Cleveland, OH: Fairbanks, Benedict & Co., 1872), 128. An Ordinance to Establish a Magazine, and Regulate the Sale of Powder, §3. Passed 10 Jan., 1956.




Paterson City Ordinances, An Ordinance concerning Police, §8 For keeping gunpowder (28 May, 1851).

“8. It shall not be lawful for any person to have or keep any quantity of Gunpowder, exceeding twenty-eight pounds, in any house, store, building, or other place within the limits of the City. And all Gunpowder which shall be kept in the City, shall be kept in tin canisters, which shall not contain more than seven pounds each, under a penalty of Five Dollars for each offence.”

1851, NJ, Paterson City Ordinances, An Ordinance Concerning Police, §8


The Charter And Ordinances Of The City of Paterson (Paterson, NJ: T. Warren, Printer, Van Houten Street, 1851), 31-32. An Ordinance Concerning Police, §8.




Laws of Illinois College, 1850, in Transactions of the Illinois State Historical Society for the Year 1906, at 245

Chapter XII. Of Crimes and Immoralities. 

Sec. 5. No student shall carry deadly weapons upon his person, on penalty of admonition, dismission or expulsion, according to the aggravation of the offense. 

Full Text: Google Books




Minutes of Proceedings of the Board of Commissioners of the Central Park for the Year Ending April 30, 1858

Be it ordained by the Commissioners of the Central Park : All persons are forbidden . . . [t]o carry fire-arms or throw stones or other missiles within it. 

(Ordinance adopted at meeting held on March 16, 1858)

Full text: Google Books




1 William B. Webb The Laws of the Corporation of the of Washington Digested and Arranged under Appropriate in Accordance with a Joint Resolution of the City 418 (1868), Act of Nov. 18, 1858.

It shall not be lawful for any person or persons to carry or have concealed about their persons any deadly or dangerous weapons, such as dagger, pistol, bowie knife, dirk knife, or dirk, colt, slungshot, or brass or other metal knuckles within the City of Washington; and any person or persons who shall be duly convicted of so carrying or having concealed about their persons any such weapon shall forfeit and pay upon such conviction not less than twenty dollars nor more than fifty dollars; which fines shall be prosecuted and recovered in the same manner as other penalties and forfeitures accruing to the city are sued for and recovered: Provided, That the Police officers when on duty shall be exempt from such penalties and forfeitures.

Full Text: Google Books 




1852 Haw. Sess. Laws 19, Act to Prevent the Carrying of Deadly Weapons

Section 1. Any person not authorized by law, who shall carry, or be found armed with, any bowie-knife, sword-cane, pistol, air-gun, slung-shot or other deadly weapon, shall be liable to a fine of no more than Thirty, and no less than Ten Dollars, or in default of payment of such fine, to imprisonment at hard labor, for a term not exceeding two months and no less than fifteen days, upon conviction of such offense before any District Magistrate, unless good cause be shown for having such dangerous weapons: and any such person may be immediately arrested without warrant by the Marshal or any Sheriff, Constable or other officer or person and be lodged in prison until he can be taken before such Magistrate.




1853 Ky. Acts 186, An Act to Prohibit the Carrying of Concealed Deadly Weapons, Ch. 1020.

Sec 1. Be it enacted by the General Assembly of the Commonwealth of Kentucky, That if any person shall hereafter carry concealed any deadly weapons, other than an ordinary pocket knife, except as provided in the next section, he shall be fined on the first conviction not less than fifth nor more than one hundred dollars, and on any subsequent conviction not less than one hundred nor more than five hundred dollars.

Sec. 2. That the carrying of concealed deadly weapons shall be legal in the following cases: 1. Where the person has reasonable grounds to believe his person, or the person of some of his family, or his property, is in danger from violence or crime. 2. Where sheriffs, constables, marshals, and policemen carry such weapons as are necessary to their protection in the efficient discharge of their duty. 3. Where persons are required by their business or occupation to travel during the night, the carrying concealed deadly weapons during such travel.

Sec. 3. This act shall be given in charge by the judges to the grand juries.




1859 Ind. Acts 129, An Act to Prevent Carrying Concealed or Dangerous Weapons, and to Provide Punishment Therefor.

Sec. 1. Be it enacted by the General Assembly of the State of Indiana, That every person not being a traveler, who shall wear or carry any dirk, pistol, bowie-knife, dagger, sword in cane, or any other dangerous or deadly weapon concealed, or who shall carry or wear any such weapon openly, with the intent or avowed purpose of injuring his fellow man, shall, upon conviction thereof, be fined in any sum not exceeding five hundred dollars.




An Ordinance Prohibiting the Sale of Arms, Ammunition, or Spiritous Liquors to the Indians, in Acts, Resolutions and Memorials Passed at the Several Annual Sessions of the Legislative Assembly of the Territory of Utah 63 (Henry McEwan 1866).

“Sec. 1. Be it ordained by the General Assembly of the State of Deseret: That if any person shall hereafter trade or give any guns, rifies,pistols or any other deadly weap- ons, ammunition or spirituous liquors to any Indian, without having a license, he shall, on conviction thereof before any Justice of the Peace, he fined in a sum not exceeding one hundred dollars for each offense, and also forfeit all the property received from the Indian, which shall be sold and the proceeds thereof paid into the public treasury.”




1859 Conn. Acts 62, An Act In Addition To And In Alteration Of “An Act For Forming And Conducting The Military Force,” chap. 82, § 7.

It shall be the duty of the quarter-master general, annually, to inspect the armories and gun houses of the several companies, and also the rooms occupied by the regimental bands; and, on or before the first day of November, to make to the adjutant-general a full report of the condition of the same, and what companies are entitled to the allowance for armory rent; for which services he shall be allowed the sum of nine cents for every mile of necessary travel.




Alexander McKinstry, The Code of Ordinances of the City of Mobile, with the Charter, and an Appendix Page 118, Image 121 (1859) available at The Making of Modern Law: Primary Sources.

Ordinances [of The City of Mobile], § 124. It is not lawful for any person to discharge any gun, pistol, fowling-piece, or fire-arm, nor to let off, or discharge, any rocket, fire-cracker, squib, or other fireworks, in any street, court, yard, lot, walk, or public highway, or from the door of any house or building, or near any house or any inhabited part of the city, on any pretext, under a penalty of five dollars, and if a slave fifteen lashes unless his employer pay the fine.




1859 Wash. Sess. Laws 107-08, An Act Relative to Crimes and Punishment, and Proceedings in Criminal Cases, ch. 2, §§ 14-15, 23.

§ 14. If either party to a duel be killed, the survivor shall be deemed guilty of murder in the second degree. § 15. If any person shall, by previous appointment made within, fight a duel without this territory, and in so doing shall inflict a mortal wound upon any person, whereof the person so injured shall die, such person so offending shall be deemed guilty of murder in the second degree, within any county in this territory. § 23. Every person who shall accept such challenge, or who shall knowingly carry or deliver any such challenge or message, whether a duel ensue or not, and every person who shall be present at the fighting of a duel with deadly weapons, as an aid, or second, or who shall advise, encourage, or promote such duel, shall, on conviction thereof, be imprisoned in the penitentiary, not more than five years nor less than six months.




1859 Conn. Acts 62, An Act in Addition to and in Alteration of “An Act For Forming And Conducting The Military Force,” chap. 82, § 5.

If any booth shed, tent, or other temporary erection, within one mile of any military parade-ground, muster-field or encampment, shall be used and occupied for the sale of spirituous or intoxicating liquor, or for the purpose of gambling, the officer commanding said parade-ground, muster-field or encampment, the sheriff or deputy-sheriff of the county, or any justice of the peace, selectman, or constable of the town in which such booth, shed, tent, or other temporary erection is situated, upon having notice or knowledge that the same is not used or occupied, shall notify the owner or occupant thereof to vacate and close the same immediately; and if said owner or occupant shall refuse or neglect so to do said commanding officer . . . may forthwith abate such booth . . . as a nuisance, and may pull down or otherwise destroy the same, with the assistance of any force, civil or military.




The Public Statutes of the State of Minnesota 798 (1859) , Chap. 120 § 1, 8.

Be it enacted by the legislature of the state of Minnesota: That all able-bodied, white male citizens resident of this state, being eighteen years of age, and under the age of forty-five years, excepting persons exempt by law, shall be enrolled in the militia, and perform military duty in such manner—not incompatible with the constitution and laws of the United States—as hereinafter prescribed. § 8. That it shall be the duty of the township assessors of the several townships, and the assessors of the several wards of the several cities, to prepare a list of all persons liable to be enrolled as aforesaid, in their respective wards, townships or districts, save and except members of uniform volunteer companies. Township, ward or district assessors aforesaid, shall annually, at the time of assessing taxable property, make out a roll or list of all names of persons enrolled as aforesaid, and place it in the auditor’s office of the proper county; and it shall be the duty of such auditor annually on or before the first day of November, to return an accurate copy of such records of enrollment to the adjutant-general of the state.




1859 Wash. Sess. Laws 108-109, An Act Relative to Crimes and Punishment and the Proceeding in Criminal Cases, ch. 2, § 28.

Every prison [sic] who shall assault and beat another with a cowhide or whip, having with him at the time a pistol or other deadly weapon, shall, on conviction thereof, be imprisoned in the county jail not more than one year nor less than three months, and be fined in any sum not exceeding one thousand dollars. (double the maximum sentence for simple assault and battery).