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1879 Va. Acts 104, City Council – Powers, Duties, etc., ch. V, § 19

To direct the location of all buildings for storing gun-powder or other combustible substances; to regulate the sale and use of gunpowder, fire-crackers, fire-works, kerosene oil, nitroglycerine . . . the discharge of firearms . . .




1879 Wyo. Sess. Laws 97, An Act to Prevent the Use of Firearms from Railroad Cars, and Provide for the Punishment Thereof, ch. 43, § 1.

It shall be unlawful for any person in this territory to fire any rifle, revolver, or other fire arm of any description whatever, from any window, door, or other part of any railroad car or train, engine or tender, or along the line of railroad during the passing of any train or engine, or when any person is passing in the vicinity of the person having such fire arm, and any person so offending, shall, on conviction, be fined in a sum not exceeding twenty ($20.00) dollars, and for a second offense, confined in the county jail for a term not exceeding sixty (60) days.




J. M. Falkner, The Code of Ordinances of the City Council of Montgomery, with the Charter Page 148-49, Image 148-49 (1879) available at The Making of Modern Law: Primary Sources.

§ 428. Any person who, not being threatened with or having good reason to apprehend an attack, or travelling or setting out on a journey, carries concealed about his person a bowie-knife or any other knife of like kind or description, or a pistol or fire-arms of any other kind or description, air gun, slung-shot, brass-knuckles, or other deadly or dangerous weapon, must, on conviction, be fined not less than one nor more than one hundred dollars.




John Prentiss Poe, The Baltimore City Code, Containing the Public Local Laws of Maryland Relating to the City of Baltimore, and the Ordinances of the Mayor and City Council, in Force on the First Day of November, 1891, with a Supplement, Containing the Public Local Laws Relating to the City of Baltimore, Passed at the Session of 1892 of the General Assembly, and also the Ordinances of the Mayor and City Council, Passed at the Session of 1891-1892, and of 1892-1893, up to the Summer Recess of 1893 Page 589, Image 598 (1893) available at The Making of Modern Law: Primary Sources.

Fire – Ordinances [of Baltimore], (City Code, (1879,) Art. 20, sec. 53) § 63. All gunpowder brought within the limits of the city by land, or into the port or harbor, in any ship or vessel, other than a ship or vessel of war, shall be stored in the said magazine as aforesaid; if brought by land as aforesaid, within seventeen hours thereafter; if brought into the port or harbor as aforesaid, within forty-eight hours after the ship or other vessel thus bringing it shall have broken bulk; proved the quantity thus brought in shall exceed the weight of one quarter barrel as above defined; or being of such weight and no more, shall be well secured in tin canisters; nor shall it be lawful for any ship or vessel, other than a ship or vessel of war, bringing gunpowder into the port or harbor of Baltimore, or having gunpowder on board, in a greater quantity than the weight of the quarter barrel as aforesaid; or being of such weight and no more, not secured as above provided, to approach, lie at anchor, or moor nearer than two hundred yards to any wharf, or land within the limits of said city, or discharge, land or deliver gunpowder in a greater quantity or otherwise secured than aforesaid, at any place within the said city, than at the wharf of the magazine aforesaid. . .




1879 Tenn. Pub. Acts 135-36, An Act to Prevent the Sale of Pistols, chap. 96, § 1.

It shall be a misdemeanor for any person to sell, or offer to sell, or to bring into the State for the purpose of selling, giving away, or otherwise disposing of belt or pocket pistols, or revolvers, or any other kind of pistols, except army or navy pistol; Provided that this act shall not be enforced against any persons now having license to sell such articles until the expiration of such present license.




1879 Tenn. Pub. Acts 231, An Act to amend the Criminal Laws of this State upon the subject of carrying concealed weapons, and amend Section 4759 of the Code.

Section 1. . . Hereafter it shall not be lawful for any person to carry, publicly or privately, any dirk, razor, concealed about his person, sword cane, spanish stilletto, belt or pocket pistol, revolver, or any kind of pistol, except the army or navy pistol, usually used in warfare, which shall be carried openly in the hand, or loaded cane, slung-shot, brass knucks; and any person guilty of a violation of this Act shall be subject to presentment or indictment, and on conviction shall be fined fifty dollars, and imprisoned in the County jail of the County where the offense was committed, the imprisonment only in the discretion of the Court; Provided, the defendant shall give good and sufficient security for all the costs, fine, and any jail fees that may accrue by virtue of the imprisonment of the defendant.




1879 Tenn. Pub. Acts 231, An Act to Amend the Criminal Laws of this State upon the Subject of Carrying Concealed Weapons . . . , ch. 186, § 1.

[I]t shall not be lawful for any person to carry, publicly or privately, any dirk, razor concealed about his person, sword cane, spanish stiletto, belt or pocket pistol, revolver, or any kind of pistol, except the army or navy pistol used in warfare, which shall be carried openly in hand, or loaded cane, slung-shot, brass knucks[.]




Charter and Revised Ordinances of Boise City, Idaho. In Effect April 12, 1894 Page 118-119, Image 119-120 (1894) available at The Making of Modern Law: Primary Sources.

Carrying Concealed Weapons, § 36. Every person not being a sheriff, deputy sheriff, constable or other police officer, who shall carry or wear within the incorporated limits of Boise City, Idaho, any bowie knife, dirk knife, pistol or sword in cane, slung-shot, metallic knuckles, or other dangerous or deadly weapons, concealed, unless such persons be traveling or setting out on a journey, shall, upon conviction thereof before the city magistrate of said Boise City, be fined in any sum not exceeding twenty-five dollars for each offense, or imprisoned in the city jail for not more than twenty days, or by both such fine and imprisonment.




1879 Mont. Laws 359, Offences against the Lives and Persons of Individuals, ch. 4, § 23.

If any person shall, by previous appointment or agreement, fight a duel with a rifle, shot-gun, pistol, bowie-knife, dirk, small-sword, back-sword, or other dangerous weapon, and in so doing shall kill his antagonist, or any person or persons, or shall inflict such wound as that the party or parties injured shall die thereof within one year thereafter, every such offender shall be deemed guilty of murder in the first degree, and, upon conviction thereof, shall be punished accordingly [death by hanging].




Revised Ordinances of the City of Fort Worth, Texas, 1873-1884 Page 113-114, Image 111-112 (1885) available at The Making of Modern Law: Primary Sources.

Ordinances of the City of Fort Worth. An Ordinance defining and punishing affrays and Disturbances of the Peace, . . .§ 2. If any person shall go into any public place, or into or near any private house, or along any public street or highway near any private house, and shall use loud and vociferous, or obscene, vulgar, or indecent language, or swear or curse, or expose his person, or rudely display any pistol or other deadly weapon in such public place, or upon such public street or highway, or near such private house, in a manner calculated to disturb the inhabitants thereof, he shall be fined in a sum not exceeding one hundred dollars. § 3. A public place, within the meaning of the two preceding sections, is any public road, street or alley, inn, tavern, store, grocery, workshop, or any place to which people resort for purposes of business, recreation, or amusement.